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Alger Data

Introduction

“Alger County is the gateway to Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, Grand Island National recreational area and Hiawatha National Forest.” (Greater Munising Bay Partnership for Commerce Development and the Alger County Chamber of Commerce, 2010) This sentence describes the largest economic draw of tourism for this rural community. 

Alger County is located at the northern part of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan; it is considered a rural community with a population density of about eleven people.  Alger is about 917 square miles with a population of 9,541 according to the 2012 census. (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2012) The county consists of seven townships, a village and a city with a population of about 2,300 people. The City of Munising is the central location for the county commission and local governments. (Greater Munising Bay Partnership for Commerce Development and the Alger County Chamber of Commerce, 2010)

Resources and Assets

It is important that rural communities lay out their resources because they are often limited and there are still needs in the area and among the people that live there. Divulging into the demographics gives a good look on the dynamic of the area, but the culture is also important. The culture of the Upper Peninsula is heavily traditional old country, immigrants from Nordic countries that have settled here and continue to have much pride of their cultures, people and land.  With this in mind we looked at the economics and resources that Alger County has to enable its growth.

Alger County has little exporting businesses. Its top businesses include Neenah Paper, Inc (264 employees) and Timber Products (150 employees). The third is the Trenary Home Bakery with 12 employees, not leaving many industry job opportunities. (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2012) While there isn’t much of an outlook for industry, the area has a lot of raw material, specifically forests to keep the longevity of the current businesses.

As stated before the county is the gateway to the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, which is one of the major attractions not only in Alger County but in the State of Michigan. It consists of forty-two miles of breathtaking rock formations and pure water of Lake Superior. The park alone is 73,236 acres not to mention the Grand Island National Recreation Area and Haiwatha National Forest that are accessible from the county as well. (Greater Munising Bay Partnership for Commerce Development and the Alger County Chamber of Commerce, 2010) These recreation areas provide miles of hiking and biking trails. Munising provides many opportunities for visitors including boat tours and rentals. (Reynolds, 2014)

The area also attracts winter tourism with the snowmobiling opportunities. Alger County receives about 141 inches of snow on average every year, giving an ideal environment for snowmobile enthusiast. There is over four hundred miles of accessible trails. Outdoor recreation is the highest economic income for the area.  (Greater Munising Bay Partnership for Commerce Development and the Alger County Chamber of Commerce, 2010)

Opportunities for Improvement

The area relies heavily on its tourism to bring money into the county, but does not focus on its raw materials and timber industries much. The partnership of Neenah Paper, Inc. and Timber Products could be beneficial to the area, creating more collaboration between the public and the companies. Education of trades and other areas can be brought into the schools to inform high school students of opportunities and allowing them to get a head start, hopefully encouraging them to stay in the area to settle down and start a career.

Recreation is already a high point of the community and economics currently but there is always more benefits that can come from improvement. There are large cities localized around the Upper Peninsula including Green Bay, WI; Detroit, MI; Duluth, MN and Milwaukee, WI. Advertisement in these cities and the more populated areas can potentially increase the amount of visitation. Working with bus tour companies to create a “canned” vacation may be appealing to those farther away.

The county specifically has a few major events including the 4th of July, Trenary Outhouse Classic, Grand Island Marathon and Munising Ice Fest. These events are not only beneficial for the organizations but also the community as a whole. The county may consider help in advertisement for the current events and thoughts of helping other organizations start other events to bring people to the area, preferably to spend money.

Conclusion

Alger County has much to offer its residents and visitors. It struggles match those of other rural communities. It takes collaboration to accomplish a successful community. Kathy Reynold, Executive Director of Alger County Chamber of Commerce, stated that everyone needs to work towards the same idea or goal and needs to work as a whole in order to benefit everyone in a limited resourced area. This concept is crucial for any community, but especially applies to rural areas.

References

  • Greater Munising Bay Partnership for Commerce Development and the Alger County Chamber of Commerce. (2010).
    Retrieved from Alger County Chamber of Commerce: algercounty.org
  • Reynolds, K. (2014, April). County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director.
  • U.S. Department of Commerce. (2012). Alger County, Michigan.
    Retrieved April 2014, from American Fact Finder: factfinder2.census.gov
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 189,728 194,742 205,902 212,554  
  Population (persons) 9,809 9,742 9,724 9,647  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 19,342 19,980 21,175 22,033  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings 0 0 297 429  
  Private Earnings 86,231 92,781 96,512 97,943  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 1,411 1,629 1,850 1,962  
  Mining 86 117 169 196  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 4,939 4,973 6,008 5,730  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 2,146 2,740  
  Retail Trade 5,850 5,819 5,808 5,952  
  Government and Government Enterprise 41,098 40,696 41,232 43,294  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 4,271 4,303 4,246 4,266  
  Wage and Salary employment 3,332 3,314 3,215 3,186  
  Proprietors Employment 939 989 1,031 1,080  
  Farm Employment 79 78 78 77  
  NonFarm Employment 4,192 4,225 4,168 4,189  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 3,191 3,211 3,194 3,235  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 86 77 95 95  
  Mining 0 10 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 192 202 229 219  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 62 84  
  Retail Trade 436 430 418 407  
  Government and Government Enterprise 1,001 1,014 974 954  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 1,868 1,825 1,817 1,702  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 244 253      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     11.30%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.1 7.80 7.9 7.5 7.8
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Kimberly-Clark Corp Munising 500
Timber Products Co Munising 280
Christmas Kewadin Casino Inc Munising 140
Munising Memorial Hospital Munising 126

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Autrain-Onota Public Schools 12657.00 1075.00 4031.00 18123.00
Burt Township School District 4392.00 3493.00 598.00 9261.00
Munising Public Schools 1226.00 6198.00 362.00 8061.00
Superior Central School District 1185.00 6097.00 608.00 7809.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Autrain-Onota Public Schools 14691.00 1095.00 1131.00 16917.00
Burt Township School District 4683.00 3003.00 696.00 8381.00
Munising Public Schools 1500.00 5988.00 341.00 7872.00
Superior Central School District 1226.00 6306.00 775.00 8307.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Autrain-Onota Public Schools 15368.00 1222.00 1052.00 17649.00
Burt Township School District 5537.00 6998.00 808.00 13408.00
Munising Public Schools 1677.00 5825.00 466.00 8435.00
Superior Central School District 1371.00 6297.00 531.00 8198.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Autrain-Onota Public Schools 18353.00 1026.00 966.00 20345.00
Burt Township School District 5522.00 5731.00 453.00 12017.00
Munising Public Schools 1944.00 5906.00 400.00 8297.00
Superior Central School District 1311.00 6669.00 441.00 8420.00

Baraga Data

Introduction

Baraga County, named after the Bishop Frederic Baraga and situated in the North Central region of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, is a sparsely populated county possessing a high degree of natural tourist attractions (Baraga County, 2012). The county was founded in 1875, and consists of five townships (Baraga, L’Anse, Spurr, Covington, and Arvon). Baraga County is located on the shore of Lake Superior, at the southeast base of the Keweenaw Peninsula. (Baraga County, 2012).

County Resources (Strengths)

 Baraga County’s main strength rests in the many outdoor recreational opportunities located there, made available by the numerous forest trails, lakes, waterfalls, and beaches in the area. The beautiful and remote outdoor features allow for activities such as mountain biking, fishing, boating, hiking, geocaching, kayaking, golfing, four-wheeling, and swimming (Baraga County, 2012).  In the winter, there are abundant recreational activities such as cross-country skiing, snow-shoeing, snowmobiling, and ice fishing. In particular, miles of Lake Superior coastline host a unique and beautiful location for outdoor recreational activities.

Challenges

As a consequence of possessing so many unspoiled natural splendors, one of Baraga County’s greatest challenges is its population, having only 8,860 residents spread over an area of 1,068 square miles. As a reflection of the already low, continually decreasing population, much of the county remains economically underdeveloped.  There have been significant decreases in occupational fields such as manufacturing, retail, and government services, countered only by slight increases in mining and construction since 1990.   Additionally, no employers of fifty or more employees have moved into the County in the past several years, and there are no R&D institutions of note.  Despite the shifting jobs landscape, the majority of residents (nearly 60%) do not commute more than fifteen minutes to work, indicating a large number of chronically unemployed/underemployed households. 

Owing to its small population, Baraga’s cultural activities are largely confined to rural festivals such as the Lake Trout Festival, “Lumberjack” Days, and the Baraga County State Park Fall Harvest Festival. Baraga County also houses a Native American reservation, which hosts the KBIC Pow-Wow on an annual basis. 

Another challenge that Baraga County faces is due to the lack of thriving higher education institutions within its borders.  While Michigan Technological University served to transform Houghton into a “town and gown” region, the effect has not had much influence on Baraga County. Currently, the only higher education institution in Baraga is the Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College, which currently only possesses a total enrollment of approximately eighty.

Opportunities

As an economically underdeveloped, sparsely populated region, Baraga County must seek out opportunities that play to its strengths.  In terms of employment, growth should be concentrated around mining, outdoor recreation, and tourism. However, since manufacturing has seen a mild resurgence post-recession, the county could offer tax incentives to lure a company looking for lower-wage employees seeking shorter commutes (Porter, Dunphy, & Salveson, 2002).  Business loans through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Business and Industry Guaranteed Loan Program could be promoted, as loan increases to the county of $1,000 per capita have been shown to trigger local employment growth of nearly 5% within the first two years of being awarded (Johnson, 2009, p.231).  On the education front, it would behoove the county to explore a greater relationship with MTU, as well as the further development of Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College.  With respect to the latter, the growth of rural community colleges have been shown to provide significant enhancements to a county’s socioeconomic infrastructure (Katsinas, 2007, p. 26).  Additionally, it would be a net positive for the Ojibwa community to increase the visibility of their heritage and cultural activities in the county.  Finally, at a time when tourist are looking for niche destinations, shops and restaurants that emphasize traditional “Yooper” culture should be encouraged.  Such features include County-sponsored ice fishing tournaments, pasty shops, craft brewing, public saunas, and other experiences unique to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. 

Conclusion

Admittedly, Baraga County faces many challenges in its emergence from economic disadvantage. Currently, educational opportunities are limited, and when coupled with the closing of working-class factories and other traditional employers, the county is presented with a situation that any economic forecaster would consider to be a rather foreboding outlook. In order to slowly climb into economic stability, Baraga County’s strengths (natural beauty, outdoor recreation) must become the focus of all relevant agents. While growth might take time, an emphasis on those strengths could prove the difference between continued stagnation and improved quality of life countywide. 

Citations

  • Baraga County (2012). Retrieved from http://www.baragacounty.org
  • Katsinas, S. (2007). Rural Community Colleges are the Land-Grant Institutions of this Century.
    The Chronicle of Higher Education, 54(9), p. 26-31.
  • Porter, D., Dunphy, R., & Salveson, D. (2002).
    Making Smart Growth Work.
  • Ann Arbor, MI: Urban Land Institute.
  • Johnson, J. (2009) Rural Economic Development in the United States: An Evaluation of U.S. Department of Agriculture's Business and Industry Guaranteed Loan Program.
    Economic Development Quarterly, 23(229), p. 229-241. doi: 10.1177
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 165,197 170,036 179,172 188,447  
  Population (persons) 8,751 8,751 8,752 8,723  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 18,877 19,437 20,472 21,581  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -82 -189 91 79  
  Private Earnings 54,236 55,564 60,355 67,483  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 4,972 0 0 0  
  Mining 86 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 3,266 3,668 4,238 4,364  
  Wholesale Trade 0 1,183 1,170 1,157  
  Retail Trade 5,563 5,622 5,831 6,086  
  Government and Government Enterprise 62,635 63,222 65,970 67,088  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 4,310 4,361 4,456 4,577  
  Wage and Salary employment 3,455 3,457 3,508 3,593  
  Proprietors Employment 855 904 948 984  
  Farm Employment 71 70 70 69  
  NonFarm Employment 4,239 4,291 4,386 4,508  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 2,444 2,535 2,618 2,742  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 197 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 172 178 183 181  
  Wholesale Trade 0 52 46 40  
  Retail Trade 351 375 373 360  
  Government and Government Enterprise 1,795 1,756 1,768 1,766  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 1,929 1,884      
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 258 277 1,802 1,767  
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     13.10%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 9.6 9.90 11.5 11.1 11.1
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
BPB manufacturing Lanse 225
Baraga County Memorial Hosp Lanse 200
Pettibone Traverse Life LLC Baraga 100
Bayside Village Lanse 100

Funding 02-03

 

Local

State

Fed

Total

Arvon Township School District

45413.00

16138.00

4058.00

69119.00

Baraga Township School District

925.00

6482.00

1,48

8882.00

L'anse Area Schools

1215.00

5837.00

652.00

7801.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Arvon Township School District 30625.00 0.00 5352.00 35976.00
Baraga Township School District 1938.00 6614.00 1616.00 10175.00
L'anse Area Schools 1320.00 5670.00 770.00 7774.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Arvon Township School District 23445.00 0.00 3796.00 27240.00
Baraga Township School District 1221.00 6696.00 1832.00 9777.00
L'anse Area Schools 1342.00 5698.00 754.00 7857.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Arvon Township School District 23096.00 0.00 2943.00 26039.00
Baraga Township School District 1011.00 6158.00 1582.00 8758.00
L'anse Area Schools 1388.00 5783.00 702.00 7914.00

 

Chippewa County Data

Introduction

Chippewa County, one of the western counties of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, holds many unique opportunities and assets, including an international border with Canada. Operating under a commission form government, Chippewa County focuses on industrial development and retail trade as the basis of their economy (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2011). Chippewa’s location on Lake Michigan and forest surroundings make it a rural destination for many tourists.

Resources and Assets

Chippewa County offers residents and visitors many arenas for outdoor play, including hundreds of miles of snowmobile trail, campgrounds, rivers for fishing and boating and golf courses (Sault Ste. Marie Convention and Visitors Bureau, 2014). Lake Superior’s shoreline contributes to the popular tourist destination while nearby casinos provide indoor recreational outlets. There are many attractive recreational opportunities the draw visitors to the area.

Chippewa County’s population is 38,917 with a median household income of $40,273 (Indiana Business Research Center, 2014). Chippewa County holds multiple education centers, including Lake Superior State University. Because of these areas, a high degree of industrial exploration occurs in the various research and development sites Chippewa enjoys, particularly in the largest city of Sault Ste. Marie (Sault Ste. Marie Economic Development Corporation, 2014). As well, the strong tourism industry, fostered by events put on through Sault Ste. Marie city leadership and county government, bring in economic support (Sault Ste. Marie Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, 2014).

Areas for Advancement

Educational obtainment for residents ranks low in comparison to other Michigan counties, with only 17.7% of the population holding college degrees (Indiana Business Research Center, 2014). With improvement on the education levels of its residents, Chippewa could attract industries with higher wages and salaries. The largest area of employment comes through government with most of the population working for the city, county or state (Jeff Hagan, personal communication, 10 April 2014). If Chippewa can attract in more business, the employment base will shift, creating more profit.

Conclusion

Chippewa County’s assets are accessible to residents and visitors alike. The county can continue to emphasize these resources to increase economic and community development. Strong education centers exist but are not currently used to their full capacity by residents. Chippewa County must work on attracting strong businesses into the area, playing up its strengths in international trade access and industrial development to bring in new developing firms. With a few key actions, Chippewa will continue to grow and develop, forming a leading community throughout Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Resources

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 741,611 265,971 808,977 840,269  
  Population (persons) 38,775 38,765 38,701 38,844  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 19,126 19,759 20,903 21,632  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -1,110 -1,110 1,081 1,306  
  Private Earnings 233,898 244,240 250,651 254,830  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 2,596 0  
  Mining 0 0 2,622 0  
  Utilities 9,105 9,860 10,110 10,310  
  Construction 261,777 24,246 25,813 25,705  
  Wholesale Trade 3,485 6,005 7,419 8,793  
  Retail Trade 43,733 43,884 45,287 46,852  
  Government and Government Enterprise 293,554 304,961 318,829 334,003  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 18,577 18,753 18,702 18,670  
  Wage and Salary employment 15,203 15,300 15,118 14,918  
  Proprietors Employment 3,374 3,453 3,584 3,752  
  Farm Employment 412 403 403 402  
  NonFarm Employment 18,165 18,350 18,299 18,268  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 10,742 10,814 10,795 10,868  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 132 0  
  Mining 0 0 100 0  
  Utilities 117 118 121 128  
  Construction 837 835 884 880  
  Wholesale Trade 138 204 236 254  
  Retail Trade 2,276 2,197 2,195 2,189  
  Government and Government Enterprise 7,423 7,536 7,504 7,400  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 8,030 7,647 7,732 7,552  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 1,220 1,279      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     14.80%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.9 8.80 8.9 8.5 8.4
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Kewadin Hotel and Convention Ctr Sault Sainte Marie 2,000
Bay mills Resort and Casino Brimley 900
War Memorial Hospital Sault Sainte Marie 250
Rudyard Area Schools Rudyard 299

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Sault Ste Marie Area Schools

1170.00

5880.00

788.00

8103.00

Detour Area Schools

6088.00

3611.00

406.00

10606.00

Pickford Public Schools

1346.00

5670.00

2876.00

10322.00

Rudyard Area Schools

693.00

6446.00

1428.00

8684.00

Brimley Area Schools

1295.00

6024.00

2330.00

9966.00

Whitefish Schools

6920.00

3319.00

869.00

11630.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Sault Ste Marie Area Schools 1365.00 6072.00 903.00 8377.00
Detour Area Schools 5945.00 3230.00 458.00 9714.00
Pickford Public Schools 1082.00 5883.00 3662.00 10761.00
Rudyard Area Schools 773.00 6720.00 1405.00 9062.00
Brimley Area Schools 1588.00 6068.00 2859.00 10516.00
Whitefish Schools 7125.00 3331.00 1345.00 11801.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Sault Ste Marie Area Schools 1480.00 5790.00 1108.00 8379.00
Detour Area Schools 7031.00 3253.00 1069.00 11353.00
Pickford Public Schools 1538.00 5701.00 3235.00 10628.00
Rudyard Area Schools 880.00 6791.00 2048.00 9760.00
Brimley Area Schools 1706.00 5883.00 2932.00 10522.00
Whitefish Schools 9734.00 5088.00 1695.00 16518.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Sault Ste Marie Area Schools 1603.00 5997.00 844.00 8481.00
Detour Area Schools 6867.00 3364.00 576.00 11056.00
Pickford Public Schools 1452.00 5944.00 3127.00 10690.00
Rudyard Area Schools 925.00 6831.00 1735.00 9490.00
Brimley Area Schools 1738.00 5722.00 1761.00 9221.00
Whitefish Schools 11200.00 3730.00 1782.00 16712.00

Delta County Data

Introduction

Delta County, located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, was formally organized in 1861 (Delta county of Michigan, n.d.). The governmental structure consists of a five member board, as followed by the State of Michigan governmental structure (Delta county of Michigan, n.d.). Located on Lake Michigan and surrounded by forests, it is a rural destination for many tourists (Delta county of Michigan, n.d.).

Resources and Assets

Delta County has many recreational assets, including bike, ATV and snowmobile trails, campgrounds, parks and beaches. Hundreds of miles of lakeshore line the popular tourist destination. Recreation contributes to Delta County’s sustainability.

Delta County’s population is 37,069 with areas of rural forest and developed communities. Over half of the county’s daily work commute is less than 15 minutes, yet plenty of opportunities for retail, dining and entertainment exist. A sampling of the cultural scene includes the William Bonifas Fine Arts Center, Pine Mountain Music Festival, Waterfront Art Festival and the annual Upper Peninsula State Fair. In addition, Bay College, Delta-Schoolcraft Career and Technical Center and the Michigan State University Extension Office offer options for higher education. Delta County, with all of its recreational and educational opportunities, is constantly building their growing community.

Areas for Advancement

Currently, the area hospital and lumber mill are the largest employers, leaving room for advancement. Another manufacturing company or factory could do well in the community but faces transportation limitations from the geographical location and northern climate. The underutilization of educational institutions by the population, reflected in the correspondingly low number of available employment requiring advanced degrees, presents opportunity for growth. More education combined with increased employment possibilities would improve the average household income, currently at $40,000 per year.

Conclusion

Delta County has many untapped resources. Educational opportunities are plentiful, but not used to their fullest potential, resulting in a job force with little education. To improve in these areas, Delta’s strengths in natural surroundings, recreation and existing business should be employed. By embracing their strengths and overcoming their challenges, Delta County will continue to thrive as a prominent community in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Resources

  • Anglin, R. (2011). Promoting sustainable local and community economic development. Boca Raton: CRC Press.
  • Delta county chamber of commerce. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://www.deltami.org
  • Delta county of Michigan. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://http://www.deltacountymi.org
    2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 923,329 962,704 991,535 1,023,414  
  Population (persons) 38,413 38,290 38,272 38,189  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 24,037 25,142 25,908 26,799  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings 418 1,322 1,424 2,237  
  Private Earnings 511,911 539,518 558,173 574,201  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 7,769 8,152 7,706 8,250  
  Mining 514 580 646 709  
  Utilities 8,056 9,541 8,728 8,696  
  Construction 36,512 39,018 43,816 49,350  
  Wholesale Trade 14,469 18,721 13,337 13,252  
  Retail Trade 51,221 53,056 56,758 56,598  
  Government and Government Enterprise 106,378 107,887 111,357 115,363  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 20,059 20,050 20,542 20,679  
  Wage and Salary employment 16,292 16,094 16,420 16,379  
  Proprietors Employment 3,767 3,956 4,122 4,300  
  Farm Employment 404 403 405 396  
  NonFarm Employment 19,655 19,647 20,137 20,283  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 17,169 17,183 17,670 17,824  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 368 323 341 326  
  Mining 23 28 26 25  
  Utilities 97 101 100 99  
  Construction 1,136 1,192 1,246 1,305  
  Wholesale Trade 402 459 373 368  
  Retail Trade 2,781 2,818 2,956 2,969  
  Government and Government Enterprise 2,486 2,464 2,467 2,459  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 8,612 8,464 8,224 8,192  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 1,138 1,206      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     11.70%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.4 8.40 7.9 7.2 7.1
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
MeadWestvaco Corp Escanaba 1,200
St. Frncis Hospital Escanaba 525
Escanaba Area School District Escanaba 479
Engineered Machined Products Escanaba 360

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Escanaba Area Public Schools

1597.00

5493.00

367.00

7630.00

Gladstone Area Schools

405.00

6564.00

239.00

7244.00

Rapid River Public Schools

1852.00

5311.00

575.00

7795.00

Big Bay De Noc School District

3128.00

4286.00

1589.00

9050.00

Bark River Harris School District

387.00

6617.00

319.00

7359.00

Mid Peninsula School District

1746.00

5326.00

590.00

7717.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Escanaba Area Public Schools 1818.00 5450.00 359.00 7627.00
Gladstone Area Schools 457.00 6503.00 220.00 7180.00
Rapid River Public Schools 1864.00 5253.00 552.00 7669.00
Big Bay De Noc School District 3443.00 3665.00 926.00 8045.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Escanaba Area Public Schools 1908.00 5351.00 346.00 7684.00
Gladstone Area Schools 456.00 6518.00 277.00 7253.00
Rapid River Public Schools 1934.00 5003.00 449.00 7524.00
Big Bay De Noc School District 4193.00 3506.00 1078.00 8786.00
Bark River Harris School District 418.00 6513.00 382.00 7361.00
Mid Peninsula School District 1958.00 5598.00 431.00 8663.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Escanaba Area Public Schools 1925.00 5425.00 449.00 7821.00
Gladstone Area Schools 499.00 6714.00 210.00 7483.00
Rapid River Public Schools 2040.00 5133.00 502.00 7718.00
Big Bay De Noc School District 4632.00 3099.00 995.00 8737.00
Bark River Harris School District 931.00 6665.00 302.00 8099.00
Mid Peninsula School District 2439.00 5687.00 479.00 8605.00

Dickinson County Data

“Mindful of the Past, Secure in the Future, Driven to Excellence”

The youngest of the eighty-three Michigan counties, Dickinson County was created in 1891 and named after Donald M. Dickinson, a prominent attorney who argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. Its 766 square miles are bordered by Iron, Marquette and Menominee Counties as well as the Menominee River (“County History/Development”). The County sits at the crossroads of US-2, US-141 and M-95 and contains the three cities Iron Mountain, Kingsford and Norway (One Click Video, n.d., “County History/Development”, n.d.).

The City of Iron Mountain website contains a modern, six part video, Iron Mountain Video TourBook, that highlights living in a “Michigan Main Street City” (One Click Video, n.d.). Touting low crime, reasonable housing ($30,000-400,000), a revitalized downtown and recreation, Iron Mountain is home to four public and two private schools, Bay West Community College, three manufacturing parks, and Dickinson County Area Health System. Residents and tourists have access to Lake Antoine Park, three museums, Pine Mountain Ski Jump, a performing arts center, five star golfing, the annual Festival of Arts, and a community garden.

The city’s economic motto is ‘stability through diversity’. Manufacturing (including paper and lumber mills), retail, tourism, education and healthcare are major employers. It is important to note the city earned a fiscally neutral rating in 2009, the last available year, with a revenue just over ten and a half million dollars (“2012 Municipal Financial Summary”, 2012).  Transportation adds to the economy through two railroads, the river and Ford Airport (One Click Video, n.d.).

Sixty-five percent of the county’s land is designated forest, recreation areas and public hunting grounds (“County History, Development”, n.d.). Where the average temperature in summer is 78 and winter is 27, recreation is heavily geared for winter sports. Skiing, hunting, ice-fishing, snowmobiling and snow shoeing are all popular (“Community Profile”, n.d.).

For those interested in site-seeing, there are three noteworthy attractions. “Big John” stands as a tall welcome and an icon for the Vulcan Iron Mine (“County History/Development”, n.d.). A WWII Glider on display recognizes the Ford plant’s wartime contribution. Finally, for those who want to hang out, tens of thousands of bats live in an old mine and can be visited at the Millie Mine Bat Viewing Area (“Area Info”, 2014).

After all of the sightseeing, a must do is stop at The Pasty Oven for a traditional, vegetable, chicken, breakfast or mini pasty, a Cornish pie (“Lodging & Food for the Iron Mountain Area in the Upper Peninsula”, n.d.). Finnish immigrants following Cornish miners brought the food as a handy dish to eat by hand in the copper mines (“Pasty”, 2014). The distinguished treat is a highlight of the Upper Peninsula, Wisconsin and northern Minnesota and difficult to find elsewhere.

Tourism is Iron Mountain’s second largest industry, undoubtedly thanks to the plentitude of recreational opportunities and the “Pure Michigan” advertising campaign (“Pure Michigan”, 2014). The fiscal responsibility of local government, an effort to revitalize Iron Mountain’s downtown, and a diversified plan to sustain the economy set Dickinson County on a path for continued success.

References

  • County history/development. (n.d.).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the Dickinson County website, www.dickinsoncounty.mi.gov
  • One Click Video. (n.d.). Iron Mountain Video TourBook.
    Retrieved from www.cityofironmountain.com
  • 2012 Municipal Financial Summary. (2012).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the City of Iron Mountain website, www.cityofironmountain.com
  • Community Profile. (n.d.).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the Dickinson County website, www.dickinsoncounty.mi.org
  • Area information. (2014).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the Tourism Association of the Dickinson County Area website, www.ironmountain.org
  • Lodging & Food for the Iron Mountain Area. (n.d.). Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the website www.exploringthenorth.com
  • Pasty. (2014, April 19).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the Wikipedia website, www.wikipedia.com
  • Pure Michigan. (2014).
    Retrieved April 23, 2014 from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation website, www.michigan.org
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 747,265 767,323 797,313 824,067  
  Population (persons) 27,258 27,253 27,666 27,589  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 27,415 28,156 28,819 29,869  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -437 -337 0 165  
  Private Earnings 465,783 475,650 490,983 503,700  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 10,658  
  Construction 86,244 84,590 72,795 72,701  
  Wholesale Trade 22,161 22,874 26,105 26,626  
  Retail Trade 50,243 52,950 57,357 59,383  
  Government and Government Enterprise 135,361 138,272 144,585 147,033  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 17,997 17,734 18,050 18,103  
  Wage and Salary employment 15,717 15,344 15,561 15,503  
  Proprietors Employment 2,280 2,390 2,489 2,600  
  Farm Employment 196 196 196 192  
  NonFarm Employment 17,801 17,538 17,854 17,911  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 14,815 14,572 14,972 15,044  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 112  
  Construction 1,910 1,778 1,642 1,552  
  Wholesale Trade 510 512 551 537  
  Retail Trade 2,572 2,604 2,741 2,754  
  Government and Government Enterprise 2,986 2,966 2,882 2,867  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 6,450 6,268 6,248 6,051  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 652 755      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     10.30%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 6 6.80 6.4 5.7 5.7
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Dickinson Memorial Hospital Iron Mountain 832
International Paper Co Inc Norway 580
Grede Foundries Inc Iron Mountain 500
Wal-Mart Stores Inc Iron Mountain 250

Funding 02-03

 

Local

State

Fed

Total

Iron Mountain City School District

678.00

5877.00

278.00

6908.00

Norway Vulcan Area Schools

826.00

6240.00

157.00

571.00

Breitung Twp School District

1696.00

5266.00

107.00

7184.00

North Dickinson country School District

2252.00

4941.00

212.00

7698.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Iron Mountain City School District 1796.00 5283.00 483.00 8059.00
Norway Vulcan Area Schools 757.00 5936.00 266.00 6969.00
Breitung Twp School District 873.00 6294.00 221.00 7389.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Iron Mountain City School District 827.00 6065.00 356.00 7265.00
Norway Vulcan Area Schools 952.00 6317.00 131.00 7402.00
Breitung Twp School District 2503.00 4705.00 170.00 7377.00
North Dickinson country School District 2764.00 4581.00 333.00 7859.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Iron Mountain City School District 888.00 6196.00 293.00 7394.00
Norway Vulcan Area Schools 1161.00 6405.00 247.00 7817.00
Breitung Twp School District 2546.00 4789.00 159.00 7496.00
North Dickinson country School District 3024.00 4661.00 313.00 8012.00

Gogebic County Data

Introduction

Gogebic County is the western gateway community to Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It borders Wisconsin and the western portion of Lake Superior. The county is home to a community college, is rich in heritage, and is nestled in the heart of the Ottawa National Forrest. Being situated in the middle of national forest land is a natural support system that has established the area as being a strong recreational destination for motorized and non-motorized enthusiasts (Ironwood Area Visitors Bureau).  The area provides outdoor entertainment during all four seasons.  Besides tourism the economy is also supported by forest products, diverse industries, and retail opportunities (Gogebic Co,MI in profile).

Resources and Assets

Gogebic County offers four seasons of fun and recreation making tourism a major industry for the area. There are five hills for downhill skiing and many additional trails for cross country skiing and snow shoeing. The collaboration between surrounding communities and agencies has also led to hundreds of miles of groomed snowmobile trails that wind throughout the county. In the summer, the same trails and more are utilized by motorized groups and mountain bike enthusiasts. Hiking, golfing, and water sports round off some of the activities that draw people to the area to play and spend money at local businesses (Western Upper Peninsula Convention and Visitors Bureau).

Gogebic County’s population is 15,916 with a median household income of $34,444. The community, in addition to tourism, has job opportunities in forest related products and a variety of manufacturing jobs. Approximately 26% of the population has some education beyond high school and over 78% of the population lives and works within the community thus demonstrating there are skilled and dedicated workers available in a general workforce pool (Gogebic Co,MI in profile).

Areas for Advancement

Gogebic County has a viable work force pool, but it does not have the job market to place the workers. The addition of a new mine or manufacturing company would help revitalize the community. Many of the small cities in Gogebic County do not want to lose their individuality, but it may be time to stop operating in silos and increase collaborative efforts (Mayor Pinardi, Mayor Frello, Mayor Bolen, personal communication, November 2013). The community needs to be a place where people want to relocate. Promoting tax incentives, sustaining amenities, and exploring new municipal trends as a whole will attract new life to this shrinking community.

Conclusion

Gogebic County has great natural assets to drive its economy, but it can no longer rely on the tourism industry to survive. Some steps such as new streetscapes are being done to create a place where people want to live and work, but more efforts are needed. The community as a whole needs to sell itself to industry prospects. It also needs to look at the needs of new age of entrepreneurs. This new workforce working through technology can work anywhere; but a community must take steps to cultivate a movement toward a new and sustainable entrepreneurial economy (Fails).

Resources

  • Fails, B. (n.d.). Entrepreneurship: It begins with a community.
    Retrieved from Michigan Municipal League: www.mml.org/events/annual/entrepreneurship
  • Gogebic Co,MI in profile. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from STATS America: www.statsamerica.org/profiles
  • Ironwood Area Visitors Bureau. (n.d.). Retrieved from Western UP Michigan Convention and Visitors Bureau: www.westernup.com/ironwood
  • Western Upper Peninsula Convention and Visitors Bureau. (n.d.). Retrieved from Pure Michigan: www.michigan.org/visitors bureaus
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 362,091 366,723 362,112 399,907  
  Population (persons) 17,475 17,275 17,025 16,852  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 20,721 21,229 23,032 23,731  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -272 -273 -269 -270  
  Private Earnings 130,569 135,233 149,984 152,227  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 5,310 5,716 6,550 6,382  
  Mining 86 117 169 196  
  Utilities 2,610 0 0 0  
  Construction 8,623 9,071 8,989 10,136  
  Wholesale Trade 2,803 2,981 3,355 0  
  Retail Trade 15,268 15,593 16,012 16,054  
  Government and Government Enterprise 78,227 79,459 80,314 81,217  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 8,406 8,376 8,263 8,201  
  Wage and Salary employment 6,836 6,750 6,567 6,423  
  Proprietors Employment 1,570 1,626 1,696 1,778  
  Farm Employment 62 61 62 61  
  NonFarm Employment 8,344 8,315 8,201 8,140  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 6,163 6,124 6,119 6,146  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 228 200 218 210  
  Mining 0 10 0 0  
  Utilities 36 0 0 0  
  Construction 397 402 392 429  
  Wholesale Trade 106 107 111 0  
  Retail Trade 956 926 914 916  
  Government and Government Enterprise 2,181 2,191 2,082 1,994  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 3,228 3,095 3,075 3,071  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 528 554      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     15.30%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 6.8 8.40 7.9 7.7 7.4
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Jacquart Fabric Products Inc Ironwood 200
Grand View Hospital Ironwood 200
Gogebic medical Care Facility Wakefield 180
Ironwood Area School District Ironwood 163

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Bessemer City School District

891.00

6158.00

400.00

7540.00

Ironwood Area Schools

4475.00

5088.00

2305.00

11869.00

Marenisco School District

4475.00

5088.00

2305.00

11869.00

Wakefield Township School District

1795.00

5763.00

928.00

8591.00

Watersmeet Township School District

6027.00

2550.00

3695.00

12888.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Bessemer City School District 1870.00 5216.00 186.00 7273.00
Ironwood Area Schools 2494.00 4611.00 348.00 7476.00
Marenisco School District 1048.00 6022.00 434.00 7513.00
Wakefield Township School District 1372.00 6036.00 756.00 8164.00
Watersmeet Township School District 5967.00 4748.00 3189.00 13904.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Bessemer City School District 1064.00 6286.00 434.00 7784.00
Ironwood Area Schools 1188.00 5985.00 640.00 7868.00
Marenisco School District 2984.00 5198.00 1087.00 9844.00
Wakefield Township School District 6796.00 2079.00 3274.00 12150.00
Watersmeet Township School District        

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Bessemer City School District 1359.00 6881.00 448.00 8689.00
Ironwood Area Schools 1327.00 6186.00 655.00 8288.00
Marenisco School District - - - -
Wakefield Township School District 3491.00 5113.00 1095.00 9763.00
Watersmeet Township School District 7571.00 1729.00 3995.00 13295.00

Houghton County Data

Introduction

Houghton County was the birthplace of professional ice hockey and was well-mined for copper as far back as the 1700’s (Copper Country Hockey History, n.d.).  The city of Houghton is home to the world’s heaviest and widest double-decked vertical lift bridge called the Portage Lift Bridge(Michigan Department of Transportation, n.d.). The bridge is the only connection to the Keweenaw Peninsula from the upper peninsula of Michigan.  Approximately 500 square miles of the total 1,500 square miles of Houghton County are water leading it to be a water lover’s paradise.  The pristine area of the state boasts abundant wildlife, many outdoor activities, and a world class technological university.

Resources and Assets

Houghton County offers a variety of activities throughout the four distinct seasons experienced.  Winter sports such as skiing, snowmobiling, snow shoeing, and ice fishing aid in the economic stability of the area.  Tourists from across the country flood to the area for the summer festivals and the extraordinary fall colors.

The county is home to 36,628 people in two cities, five villages, and many other small rural communities (Houghton County, n.d.).  The major employers for the county include Michigan Technological University, a premier state engineering school, and Portage Health System, a regional hospital and clinic.  Access to the area includes by water through the Portage Canal, by air at the Houghton Memorial Airport, and by rail. The community is one rich with Finnish culture and heritage.  Communities host a variety of events such as Bridgefest in Houghton, Strawberry Festival in Chassell, Parade of Nations in Houghton, the Houghton County Fair, and Winter Carnival at Michigan Technological University (City of Houghton, n.d.).  While Michigan Tech is the main employer and premier option for higher education, Finlandia University and Gogebic Community College also offer educational opportunities in the county.  Houghton County offers a strong community, rich with a copper mining history, and people dedicated to the area and each other.

Areas for Advancement

Michigan Technological University offers significant possibilities of growth for businesses considering the area.  Their research partnerships with communities and businesses, have led to improved economic growth and development.  The community fully embraces the university and utilizes them often but this could be expanded upon.  Utilizing the university to identify shortcomings in the area that limit their ability to provide comprehensive education to students could assist in the attainment of resources to help the area build infrastructure.  While manufacturing businesses could certainly move into the area, the opportunity for growth in the smaller business sector could prove to better support the community by bringing products and services to the rural areas.   

Challenges

The area is home to an extremely educated talent pool but the rural location includes a few challenges.  New businesses require high speed fiber to transmit information and the region is running short on available bandwidth to support some of the technological companies interested in the area.  The distance from major metropolitan areas also discourages potential businesses and organizations to consider the area due to a lack of sufficient infrastructure to support them.  For instance, the entire county does not have cellular coverage.  The area is not well prepared to handle things such as hazardous waste, with minimal haulers that service the area, and extreme winters that shorten the shipping and transportation season.  Also, despite the rural location of the county, the areas close to the cities do not currently have many available sites for businesses or organizations to consider (Jeff Ratcliffe, personal communication, April 9, 2014). 

Conclusion

Houghton County is a pristine county in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and is home to people with strong work ethic and resilience.  The communities are safe, well maintained, and established enough to provide most of the products and services that people demand.  They do face a few challenges due to their remote location including poor cellular coverage, minimal available bandwidth for internet connections, harsh winters, and transportation difficulties.  The county should continue to promote growth at the smaller business, technology, and manufacturing levels to continue to build the infrastructure that could support larger businesses in the future. 

Resources

  • Michigan Department of Transportation. (n.d.). US 41/Portage Lake.
    Retrieved from https://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,4616,7-151-9620_11154_11188-28585--,00.html
  • Copper Country Hockey Hisotry. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://www.cchockeyhistory.org/
  • Houghton County. (n.d.). Demographics.
    Retrieved from http://www.houghtoncounty.net/
  • City of Houghton. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://www.cityofhoughton.com/info-plans.php
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 725,499 739,626 789,878 817,400  
  Population (persons) 35,666 35,486 35,656 35,577  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 20,341 22,153 22,153 22,976  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -107 -129 0 0  
  Private Earnings 277,162 290,593 314,026 322,836  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 6,736 0 0 0  
  Mining 692 0 0 0  
  Utilities 8,393 9,135 9,313 0  
  Construction 35,809 39,419 45,628 47,109  
  Wholesale Trade 5,687 5,977 6,041 7,901  
  Retail Trade 39,210 39,939 41,004 39,578  
  Government and Government Enterprise 200,183 201,507 205,709 210,672  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 17,417 17,587 17,860 17,974  
  Wage and Salary employment 14,484 14,509 14,648 4,611  
  Proprietors Employment 2,933 3,078 3,212 3,363  
  Farm Employment 192 190 190 187  
  NonFarm Employment 17,225 17,397 17,670 17,787  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 12,532 12,757 13,174 13,316  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 282 0 0 0  
  Mining 26 0 0 0  
  Utilities 111 116 117 0  
  Construction 1,162 1,190 1,265 1,290  
  Wholesale Trade 169 173 178 204  
  Retail Trade 2,469 2,465 2,376 2,357  
  Government and Government Enterprise 4,693 4,640 4,496 4,471  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 7,580 7,457 7,837 7,809  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 1,099 1,176      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     14.80%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 6.8 7.00 6.4 6.4 6.8
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Portage Health Systems Hancock 450
Keweena Memorial medical Ctr Laurium 425
Michigan Technological Univ. Houghton 400
Houghton County Medical Care Hancock 250

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Hancock Public Schools

871.00

6503.00

257.00

7850.00

Adam Township School District

641.00

6816.00

763.00

8221.00

Calumet Public Schools

694.00

6277.00

576.00

7702.00

Chassell township School District

844.00

6214.00

810.00

7907.00

Elm River Township School District

11256.00

0.00

1035.00

14005.00

Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area Schools

840.00

6497.00

323.00

7660.00

Houghton-Portage Township Schools

88.00

6026.00

334.00

7593.00

Lake Linden Hubbell School District

1071.00

6167.00

918.00

8171.00

Stanton township School District

1465.00

6256.00

821.00

8542.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Hancock Public Schools 1020.00 6437.00 281.00 7778.00
Adam Township School District 1366.00 6950.00 298.00 8737.00
Calumet Public Schools 780.00 6305.00 703.00 7788.00
Chassell township School District 863.00 6310.00 294.00 7466.00
Elm River Township School District 20023.00 0.00 2259.00 22282.00
Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area Schools 654.00 6239.00 514.00 7408.00
Houghton-Portage Township Schools 913.00 6064.00 425.00 7405.00
Lake Linden Hubbell School District 1097.00 5731.00 403.00 7432.00
Stanton township School District 1579.00 5332.00 1152.00 8064.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Hancock Public Schools 1098.00 6380.00 222.00 7722.00
Adam Township School District 837.00 6629.00 359.00 7824.00
Calumet Public Schools 768.00 6190.00 559.00 7518.00
Chassell township School District 969.00 6331.00 285.00 7585.00
Elm River Township School District 13118.00 0.00 1604.00 14722.00
Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area Schools 726.00 6177.00 370.00 7273.00
Houghton-Portage Township Schools 1039.00 6090.00 452.00 7600.00
Lake Linden Hubbell School District 1191.00 5828.00 318.00 7349.00
Stanton township School District 1726.00 5333.00 565.00 7624.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Hancock Public Schools 1324.00 6593.00 317.00 8671.00
Adam Township School District 1084.00 7055.00 350.00 8489.00
Calumet Public Schools 997.00 6412.00 532.00 7943.00
Chassell township School District 1158.00 6540.00 287.00 7999.00
Elm River Township School District 12261.00 0.00 1387.00 13648.00
Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area Schools 877.00 6412.00 797.00 8086.00
Houghton-Portage Township Schools 966.00 6192.00 439.00 7599.00
Lake Linden Hubbell School District 1330.00 5890.00 303.00 7624.00
Stanton township School District 1757.00 5679.00 535.00 8037.00

Iron County Data

Iron County, Michigan is rich with history of hunting and fishing grounds for the Ojibwa Indians, and later with iron ore and forestry in the 1840s and 1850s when the county started to expand.  They have an estimated population in 2013 of 11,516 according to the United States Census.[1] The county covers 788,070 acres of land, most of which (424,665 acres) is covered with public use forest, while 41,500 acres are streams, rivers, and lakes.[2]

The people ages 25-64 that have attained at least twelve years of schooling is 45.84% in 2011, and those obtaining a bachelor’s degree or higher is approximately 17%.[3]   The total number of houses equals approximately 5,500 and the median household income in 2012 was $35,551.[4]  The median list price for a single family home is $95,000.  The average rental price for a one-bedroom apartment is $415, two-bedroom apartment $503, and a three-bedroom apartment $615. The number of occupied rental units is around 1,000.[5] 

Iron County has strengths that should be mentioned, the most important are their culture and tourism.  Annually they hold several events to engage their residents as well as the tourists that frequent the area. They hold the Upper Peninsula Championship Rodeo in Iron River around July. Like many other rodeos the events include barrel racing, bull riding, down roping, steer wrestling, bareback riding, and many more.[6]  Iron County is also the home of events such as the Iron County Fair held in August, the Iron County Museum Fine Arts Show in August, and Heritage Day in May. 

Tourism helps the Upper Peninsula thrive and in Iron County there are several activities tourists can engage themselves in throughout the four-seasons.  During the winter months, activities include skiing, hunting, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing.  The spring and summer seasons, Iron County offers several golf courses, fishing, hiking, All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) trails, camping and many other activities.[7]  The Iron County Chamber of Commerce website is a great resource for all information regarding economic development, area events and activities, history of Iron County and tourist information. 

There are areas where Iron County could improve in the eyes of a prospective employer.  Expanding on their already thriving tourist base, they could advertise their existing assets to drive more people to the area.  Utilizing their extensive history with the Ojibwa Indians, iron ore, and forestry they could bring in tourists that thrive off rich heritage of an area.  Advertising the Iron County Heritage Trail, the Iron County Museum and the activities held by the Harbour House could bring in an extensive amount of tourists. 

They could also improve their transportation routes to accommodate industries, manufacturers, and economic development.  Currently they have two public airports that have the capacity to harbor commercial cargo.  They have major highway access through US-2 and US-141 as well as MI-69, MI-73 and MI-189 but they lack the immediate access to the freeways of Wisconsin.  The railroad is another area of transportation within the county, but the E&LS rail system is not equipped to handle massive amounts of economic boom. 

Finally, Iron County could improve their likeability among economic developers and companies looking to relocate by pushing more of their residents to achieve some sort of a college degree.  The majority of people living in the county (46%) have only a high school diploma, where only 17% of the residents have achieved a bachelor’s degree or higher.  Having more people with some type of degree beyond high school would improve their workforce and the overall quality of life throughout the county. 

Overall, Iron County has several strengths that should be expanded on with their rich culture, history and tourism base.  There are several areas of advancement they should focus on before actively pursuing economic development as a whole, such as the workforce of the county and the educational attainment as well as the transportation routes to accommodate the companies that could consider moving their home location to Iron County.

  1. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/26/26071.html
  2. http://iron.org/welcome-to-the-iron-county-chamber-of-commerce/area-acti...
  3. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/26/26071.html
  4. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/26/26071.html
  5. http://www.city-data.com/county/Iron_County-UT.html
  6. http://www.upprorodeo.com/events/
  7. http://iron.org/welcome-to-the-iron-county-chamber-of-commerce/area-acti...
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 280,943 291,519 305,810 316,057  
  Population (persons) 12,792 12,728 12,493 12,415  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 21,962 22,904 24,479 25,458  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -275 -214 -493 -289  
  Private Earnings 91,614 99,332 105,246 108,740  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 2,611 2,991 2,495 2,237  
  Construction 10,903 10,176 10,996 11,571  
  Wholesale Trade 1,954 2,169 2,456 2,630  
  Retail Trade 11,970 10,543 10,900 10,997  
  Government and Government Enterprise 44,295 45,904 43,347 45,559  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 5,612 5,779 5,675 5,625  
  Wage and Salary employment 4,327 4,423 4,261 4,148  
  Proprietors Employment 1,285 1,414 1,414 1,477  
  Farm Employment 113 111 112 110  
  NonFarm Employment 5,499 5,668 5,563 5,515  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 4,239 4,403 4,471 4,414  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 35 35 32 27  
  Construction 366 397 396 404  
  Wholesale Trade 75 78 105 107  
  Retail Trade 747 745 744 729  
  Government and Government Enterprise 1,260 1,265 1,902 1,101  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 2,410 2,356 2,328 2,240  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 356 400      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     12.90%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.1 7.40 7.5 7.3 7.1
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Lake Shore Inc Iron River 200
Iron County Medical Care Fclty Crystal Falls 190
West Iron Co Pub School Dist. Iron River 175
Iron County Community Hospital Iron River 150

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Forest Park School District

2914.00

4460.00

225.00

7816.00

West Iron County School District

1797.00

5914.00

628.00

8481.00

Keweenaw County        
Grant township Schools

18754.00

880.00

0.00

20174.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Forest Park School District 3040.00 4320.00 349.00 7737.00
West Iron County School District 1942.00 5518.00 545.00 8006.00
Keweenaw County        
Grant township Schools 30160.00 21.00 0.00 30181.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Forest Park School District 3393.00 4025.00 267.00 7705.00
West Iron County School District 2001.00 5282.00 529.00 7826.00
Keweenaw County        
Grant township Schools 26829.00 231.00 310.00 27369.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Forest Park School District 3642.00 3701.00 236.00 7672.00
West Iron County School District 2003.00 5506.00 788.00 8405.00
Keweenaw County        
Grant township Schools 58135.00 0.00 717.00 58852.00

Keweenaw County Data

Keweenaw County is the most northern county in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. With approximately 2,156 residents, Keweenaw County is the least populated county in Michigan. Spread across 540.97 square miles, many of the residents of Keweenaw County are descendants of miners. (Northern Michigan University’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, 2012) With the highest proportion of water area to total area of all the counties in the United States (Keweenaw County, 2013), one of Keweenaw County’s biggest assets is its geography. The county is home to twenty-three parks and beaches, ten waterfalls, six scenic drives, twelve lighthouses, four guided tours (Keweenaw Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, 2012), a golf course, hiking and biking trails, skiing and snowmobile trails, safe harbors, and migratory bird flyways (Keweenaw County, 2013). Some of the main attractions include the Brockway Mountain Drive, the Keweenaw Mountain Lodge, Mount Bohemia, the Keweenaw Water Trail, the Keweenaw Underwater Preserve, Isle Royal, and Fort Wilkins State Park (Keweenaw Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, 2012).

“Nature-based tourism” is important to Keweenaw County’s economy. Tourism and recreation have increased with the use of public-access facilities to Lake Superior and the use of undeveloped land for creating trail systems for non-motorized and motorized sports (Keweenaw County, 2013). In Keweenaw County, 11.11 percent of employed residents work in retail trade and 14.9 percent of employed residents work in arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services, for a total of 26.01 percent of residents working in tourism related industries. This trend is unique to Keweenaw County as only 9.09 percent of Michigan employed residents and only 8.86 percent of employed residents in the United States work in arts, entertainment, recreation, accommodation, and food services (USA.com, 2013). Overall, Lake Superior, smaller inland lakes, the forest, the rolling hills and the mountain peaks have been one of the area’s most significant assets as they have attracted visitors from outside the county and created tourism jobs for county residents. 

Keweenaw County is adequately supported by several community economic development institutions (CEDIs) including the Keweenaw County Economic Committee, the Keweenaw Economic Development Alliance (KEDA), the Keweenaw Chamber of Commerce, and the Western Upper Peninsula Planning and Development Region. The support from these entities should be considered a strength and an opportunity for Keweenaw County.

In Keweenaw County, there is only one school in Grant Township and it is a one room schoolhouse (Copper Harbor Schools, 2012). Another school, Calumet-Laurium-Keweenaw (CLK) Public Schools, which is located in Calumet, MI (Houghton County) also serves students who live in Keweenaw County (The Public Schools of Calumet-Laurium-Keweenaw, 2013).

All of the townships in Keweenaw County have shown that they value education and care about the future of their communities by supporting an extra-voted millage for the Copper County Intermediate School District and an extra-voted millage for school debt (Anderson, 2013). This is a sustainable practice for investing in their community.

There aren’t community colleges or vocational or trades schools in the county (Northern Michigan University’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, 2012), so this is an area for advancement. In fact, only 8.8 percent of people in Keweenaw County have an associate’s degree and 68.4 percent have some college education or less (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013). But, the presence of Michigan Technological University (MTU) in Houghton, MI should be considered an opportunity for Keweenaw County.

The median household income in Keweenaw County is $42,406, but 44 percent of the households in the county make under $35,000 a year (U.S. Census Bureau, 2013). Having the support of a community college, or a vocational or trade school, would help create economic development for both citizens and the county because the main goal of a community college is to provide job specific training for people in the community (Anglin, 2011, p. 195).

While no data could be found on business start-ups in Keweenaw County specifically, Houghton County, Keweenaw County’s southern neighbor, has a small business incubator called MTEC SmartZone. SmartZone works with MTU, KEDA, and the Keweenaw Chamber of Commerce and is connected to statewide economic development organizations. The goal of SmartZone is to increase employment, wealth and recognition for the Upper Peninsula by providing facilities and resources to help business succeed. (MTEC-SmartZone, 2013)

There are no airports located in Keweenaw County, but there is a regional airport in Houghton County, the Houghton County Memorial Airport. The only major highway going through Keweenaw County is U-S 41 (Northern Michigan University’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship, 2012). Because these are the only modes of transportation, mobility may be considered an area for advancement.

Keweenaw County has many assets including regional support from CEDIs, sustainable practices regarding investment in education, innovation in the public sector with business incubators, and natural resources and beautiful landscapes to attract tourists. Some areas for advancement include workforce development and mobility.

Resources

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 49,711 51,730 54,741 55,908  
  Population (persons) 2,253 2,235 2,206 2,172  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 22,064 23,145 24,815 25,740  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings 0 0 0 0  
  Private Earnings 11,164 11,558 12,324 13,204  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 727 0 0 0  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 264  
  Retail Trade 748 824 824 934  
  Government and Government Enterprise 4,222 4,343 4,343 4,215  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 843 870 858 886  
  Wage and Salary employment 625 625 605 623  
  Proprietors Employment 218 245 253 263  
  Farm Employment 0 0 0 0  
  NonFarm Employment 843 870 858 886  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 685 716 704 746  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 27 32 0 0  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 15  
  Retail Trade 73 86 87 94  
  Government and Government Enterprise 158 154 154 140  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 453 438 438 410  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 51 53      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     12.80%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 8.9 10.30 11.5 10.5 10
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Lake Shore Inc Iron River 200
Iron County Medical Care Fclty Crystal Falls 190
West Iron Co Pub School Dist. Iron River 175
Iron County Community Hospital Iron River 150

Funding 02-03

 

Local

State

Fed

Total

Grant township Schools

18754.00

880.00

0.00

20174.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Grant township Schools 30160.00 21.00 0.00 30181.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Grant township Schools 26829.00 231.00 310.00 27369.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Grant township Schools 58135.00 0.00 717.00 58852.00

Luce County Data

Introduction

Luce County is located on the shores of Lake Superior along the northeastern edge of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  The lightly populated county, with just over 6,500 people in the 900 square miles (United States Census Bureau State & County Quickfacts, 2014), is primarily made up of State forestland and freshwater swampland (Luce County, Michigan, 2006).  Luce County, while primarily rural in nature, has many potentialities when it comes to their future economic development.  According to Carmen Pittenger, the Executive Director of the Luce County Economic Development Corporation, the largest employers in Luce County are the State and local governments, Louisiana Pacific, the Newberry Correctional Facility, and the Helen Newberry Joy Hospital (Personal Correspondence, April 2, 2014).  There are many areas which could prove to be well suited for economic development within the county, but currently remain underdeveloped.

Strengths

The biggest strengths for Luce County appear to be those resources which are most readily abundant in the area: forestland and waterways.  Luce County contains 31 miles of Lake Superior shoreline (Operation Action U.P. Luce County, 2013). Not only is this land financially valuable, but it also provides access to one of the largest freshwater lakes in the world.  There are also over 600 miles of rivers and streams, 15,000 acres of inland lakes, and over 300,000 acres of public access land (Operation Action U.P. Luce County, 2013).  This abundance of forestland provides a valuable resource aside from the logging industry.

Areas for Advancement

Luce County could stand to improve their numbers in educational attainment as well.  In Luce County 43.1% of the population have solely a high school diploma, while only 21.5% have a degree of some sort (Luce County, 2014).  Higher education is readily available near Luce County.  There are five secondary schools, both Community College and university, within a two-hour drive (Colleges & Private Schools, n.d.).  It could be very beneficial for Luce County to increase these numbers and build their skilled workforce.  Having a highly educated and skilled population could create a more entrepreneurial environment and help spur economic growth.

The primary strengths of Luce County are also an area for great advancement.  The utilization of these natural resources could prove to be Luce County’s greatest attraction for increasing the travel tourism industry, as well as drawing possible residents and businesses to the area.  The travel tourism industry is an industry which Luce County should be working to expand year round.  This can be done through extensive biking, hiking, and ATV trails; fishing destinations; and Lake Superior tours and kayak rentals

Luce County could stand to improve their numbers in educational attainment as well.  In Luce County 43.1% of the population have solely a high school diploma, while only 21.5% have a degree of some sort (Luce County, 2014).  Higher education is readily available near Luce County.  There are five secondary schools, both Community College and university, within a two-hour drive (Colleges & Private Schools, n.d.).  It could be very beneficial for Luce County to increase these numbers and build their skilled workforce.  Having a highly educated and skilled population could create a more entrepreneurial environment and help spur economic growth.

These educational numbers can be somewhat deceiving when analyzing Luce County.  There is the real possibility that much of the younger population which pursues an education never returns to the area.  This could be because of lack of work, career possibilities, or other social reasons seeing the area is largely rural.  Regardless the reason, the solution would be to address the loss of this skilled and educated workforce.

Challenges

The primary challenge for Luce County is transitioning from a rural community, heavily reliant on government jobs, to a small budding community, emphasizing the available assets and strengths, and working to retain the skilled younger generation.  To overcome this obstacle, Luce County would need a progressive, ambitious, individual or group who had the resources and ideas to start this long-term process.

Conclusion

There are many positive possibilities for Luce County, yet there are many obstacles which stand in their way to future economic growth.  The natural resources found in Luce County provide an abundant and accessible industry which can be utilized and expanded.  Properly approaching and marketing these resources could be a great way to begin the process of transforming Luce County from a small rural community to a small, yet thriving economic hub of activity.  One of the greatest obstacles faced is retaining their ambitious educated youth, and expanding and encouraging education for more of their youth.  If Luce County is able to make progress in these two areas there is a good chance that economic growth and entrepreneurial activity may accelerate in the County.

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 126,305 129,787 136,217 19,469  
  Population (persons) 7,013 6,879 6,879 6,773  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 18,010 18,867 19,886 19,115  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings 1,254 1,101 950 894  
  Private Earnings 44,995 47,903 47,974 32,008  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 3,426  
  Mining 0 0 149 172  
  Utilities 153 107 87 118  
  Construction 2,431 2,470 2,312 2,234  
  Wholesale Trade 3,162 3,211 3,453 3,371  
  Retail Trade 6,240 6,191 5,925 5,691  
  Government and Government Enterprise 41,022 40,909 43,100 46,354  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 2,974 3,009 2,962 2,645  
  Wage and Salary employment 2,441 2,431 2,363 2,018  
  Proprietors Employment 533 578 599 627  
  Farm Employment 43 43 43 42  
  NonFarm Employment 2,931 2,966 2,919 2,603  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 1,960 2,016 1,953 1,620  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 92  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 126 130 115 108  
  Wholesale Trade 67 68 68 66  
  Retail Trade 349 356 328 318  
  Government and Government Enterprise 971 950 966 983  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 1,444 1,322 1,303 1,300  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 226 265      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     16.20%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.3 7.70 7.5 7.6 7.5
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Rensen Screw Ahmeek 30
Lake Superior Bible Conference Eagle River 21
N/A    
N/A    

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Tahquamenon Area Schools

1844.00

5435.00

594.00

8045.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Tahquamenon Area Schools 1972.00 5278.00 698.00 7961.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Tahquamenon Area Schools 2330.00 5224.00 1092.00 8661.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Tahquamenon Area Schools 2532.00 5071.00 686.00 8303.00

Mackinac County Data

Introduction

Mackinac County is located in the Eastern Upper Peninsula and serves as the gateway to the Upper Peninsula as you drive north on the Mackinac Bridge.  Mackinac County is a great place to live and visit. Mackinac County is a destination point for tourists interested in culture, history and exploring the outdoors. It is home to Mackinac Island, Bois Blanc Island and the 36 island archipelago known as the Les Cheneaux Islands. We are also home to the Mackinac Bridge, the Grand Hotel, the Kewadin Shores Casino, Naubinway Antique Snowmobile Center and the St. Ignace Boardwalk with its many parks and anchored by the recently renovated St. Ignace Marina (Mackinac County, 2014). Located on the shores of both Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, Mackinac County is a premier tourist destination.

Resources and Assets

One of the many assets that Mackinac County has to offer is the fact that the county’s rich history draws thousands of people from across the country. There are many historical parks and areas in Mackinac County. MackinacIsland, Marquette Mission Park, Mackinac Bridge, Fort Mackinac and the Grand Hotel are some of the most popular areas in the county. Also in St.Ignace, there is the Father Marquette National Memorial and Museum, and St.Ignace is home to the burial site of Father Marquette (Mackinac County Fact Book, 2014). Perhaps the most significant impact on the county in modern times was the construction of the Mackinac Bridge in 1957.

The 2010 census population of Mackinac County was 11,113 households, with a median household income of $38,507 (U.S. Census Bureau [BOC], 2010). Residents of Mackinac County have access to multiple higher education centers. Traditional curriculums can be found at the following area institutes; Bay Mills Community College, Lake Superior State University, North Central Michigan College. For residents looking for non-traditional programs there is the Wooden Boat Building School in Cedarville, Michigan and the new Les Cheneaux Culinary School located on the beautiful Les Cheneaux Islands (EUP Planning, 2012).

In addition to its historical draw and access to multiple institutes of higher education, Mackinac County hosts numerous events that bring in thousands of tourists each year. The large influx in tourism increases revenue in the county, particularly in St. Ignace and on Mackinac Island. The draw to northern Michigan in the summer creates jobs and steady, seasonal income for area residents. Among many events, some of the most notable are; the annual Mackinac Bridge Walk, the Chicago Yacht Club Race to Mackinac and the St. Ignace Car Show (Mackinac County, 2014).

Areas for Advancement

While tourism brings a boom of seasonal business during the summer and fall months in Mackinac County, it creates a large dependency on the service industry. By 2012, 2,056 of 4,470 jobs will be held in the service industry (BOC, 2010). This is nearly half of the labor force. The seasonal nature of this county makes it difficult for area residents to find year-round employment. In 2013, the unemployment rate in Mackinac County had risen to 11.7%, which was well above the state average of 7.5% (United States Bureau of Labor Statistics [BLS], 2010). Also contributing to the rise unemployment is the drop in new construction and manufacturing jobs. In 2000, there were 585 construction jobs, in 2012 that number plunged to 392 (BOC, 2010). Manufacturing jobs have gone down as well with a less significant drop in numbers. Overall, Mackinac County has a low percentage of workforce with a degree past high school, thus lowering that average income. Only 26% of the workforce has earned an associated degree or higher (BOC, 2010). This ranks low when compared to the state average. With a stronger focus on education obtainment among residents and close proximity to colleges, this area may be able to attract larger corporations and start-up businesses. Consequently, bringing higher wages and steady, year-round employment to the region.

Conclusion

Mackinac County is rich in history, area events that attract tourism and access to higher education. The dependency on seasonal income of the tourist influx during the summer months makes working in this county year-round difficult. With an emphasis on the vast natural resources in the area and the ability to take advantage of opportunities for higher education, Mackinac County has the capability to grow its economy and attract business to create higher paying, higher level jobs.

Resources

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 292,024 295,843 314,915 322,055  
  Population (persons) 11,580 11,464 11,388 11,253  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 25,218 25,806 27,653 28,619  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -332 -473 72 146  
  Private Earnings 121,024 122,069 124,865 125,081  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 0 0 0 0  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 12,495 13,445 13,488 13,441  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 0  
  Retail Trade 16,672 17,048 16,840 16,354  
  Government and Government Enterprise 53,685 57,436 60,488 62,697  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 7,070 7,017 6,959 6,885  
  Wage and Salary employment 5,589 5,457 5,325 5,166  
  Proprietors Employment 1,481 1,560 1,634 1,719  
  Farm Employment 1,481 111 111 109  
  NonFarm Employment 112 6,906 6,848 6,776  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 7,070 5,383 5,330 5,291  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 5,589 0 0 0  
  Mining 1,418 0 0 0  
  Utilities 112 0 0 0  
  Construction 6,958 527 508 499  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 0  
  Retail Trade 841 832 781 769  
  Government and Government Enterprise 1,520 1,523 1,518 1,485  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 2,396 2,311 2,280 2,233  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 340 337      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     10.50%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 9.3 9.40 9.9 10.1 9.6
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Grand Hotel Mackinac Island 550
Kewadin Shores Casino Saint Ignace 500
Mackinac Straits Hospital/Hlth Saint Ignace 190
Saint Ignace School Dist Saint Ignace 104

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
St. Ignace City School District

1394.00

5680.00

728.00

8038.00

Bois Blanc Pines School District

22274.00

7387.00

4932.00

34593.00

Les Cheneaux Community School District

4180.00

3733.00

698.00

8812.00

Engadine Consolidated Schools

4867.00

2746.00

1149.00

9001.00

Moran Township School District

8863.00

270.00

1257.00

10390.00

Mackinac Island Public Schools

11869.00

418.00

0.00

13558.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
St. Ignace City School District 1547.00 5543.00 932.00 8059.00
Bois Blanc Pines School District 35012.00 7447.00 2150.00 44609.00
Les Cheneaux Community School District 4516.00 3312.00 845.00 8679.00
Engadine Consolidated Schools 5147.00 2551.00 798.00 8539.00
Moran Township School District        
Mackinac Island Public Schools 8968.00 668.00 670.00 10496.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
St. Ignace City School District 1709.00 5249.00 1036.00 8031.00
Bois Blanc Pines School District 36711.00 5672.00 1311.00 43693.00
Les Cheneaux Community School District 5035.00 2847.00 990.00 8872.00
Engadine Consolidated Schools 5809.00 2499.00 983.00 9309.00
Moran Township School District 10587.00 143.00 1312.00 12473.00
Mackinac Island Public Schools 15935.00 1707.00 1834.00 19477.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
St. Ignace City School District 1978.00 5567.00 717.00 8308.00
Bois Blanc Pines School District 27205.00 3498.00 5800.00 36503.00
Les Cheneaux Community School District 5851.00 2769.00 788.00 9578.00
Engadine Consolidated Schools 6531.00 1854.00 1439.00 9845.00
Moran Township School District 11765.00 118.00 792.00 12816.00
Mackinac Island Public Schools 14563.00 1433.00 434.00 16430.00

Marquette County Data

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 1,504,639 295,843 1,643,671 1,714,303  
  Population (persons) 64,672 11,464 64,846 64,677  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 23,266 25,806 25,347 26,506  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -302 -473 -454 -198  
  Private Earnings 781,914 122,069 887,535 924,160  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 4,447 0 4,956 5,670  
  Mining 93,915 0 108,569 113,039  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 56,366 13,445 68,321 76,057  
  Wholesale Trade 21,969 0 27,952 30,185  
  Retail Trade 83,174 17,048 88,716 90,630  
  Government and Government Enterprise 280,803 57,436 287,762 297,432  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 34,406 7,017 35,418 36,023  
  Wage and Salary employment 29,800 5,457 30,396 30,754  
  Proprietors Employment 4,606 1,560 5,022 5,269  
  Farm Employment 153 111 151 149  
  NonFarm Employment 34,253 6,906 35,267 35,874  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 27,493 5,383 28,713 29,302  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 219 0 224 234  
  Mining 1,717 0 1,526 1,522  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 1,667 527 1,834 1,950  
  Wholesale Trade 653 0 724 729  
  Retail Trade 4,641 832 4,796 4,773  
  Government and Government Enterprise 6,760 1,523 6,554 6,572  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 12,950 2,311 13,168 12,958  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 1,458 337      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     12.10%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 6.8 9.40 6.1 5.7 6
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Marquette General Heath System Marquette 1,857
Northern Michigan University Marquette  
Empire Iron Mining Partnership Palmer 1,000
Tilden Mining Co. Ishpeming 900

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
N.I.C.E. Community Schools

868.00

6121.00

193.00

8985.00

Gwinn Area Community Schools

896.00

6182.00

568.00

8466.00

Negaunee Public Schools

745.00

6236.00

267.00

7585.00

Powell Township School District

9860.00

978.00

414.00

12632.00

Republic Michigamme Schools

3926.00

5855.00

815.00

10845.00

Wells Township School District

15829.00

625.00

179.00

16958.00

Marquette City School District

1784.00

5383.00

206.00

7738.00

Ishpeming Public School District

791.00

6534.00

549.00

8224.00

North Star Academy

387.00

8973.00

3435.00

14108.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
N.I.C.E. Community Schools 8968.00 668.00 670.00 10496.00
Gwinn Area Community Schools 12797.00 340.00 377.00 13515.00
Negaunee Public Schools 1066.00 6434.00 308.00 9646.00
Powell Township School District 1213.00 6155.00 643.00 8053.00
Republic Michigamme Schools 973.00 6221.00 412.00 7670.00
Wells Township School District 13284.00 764.00 1544.00 15608.00
Marquette City School District 4769.00 5334.00 451.00 10603.00
Ishpeming Public School District 12494.00 375.00 748.00 13616.00
North Star Academy 2215.00 5244.00 336.00 7809.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
N.I.C.E. Community Schools 1332.00 6180.00 241.00 7767.00
Gwinn Area Community Schools 1492.00 6169.00 592.00 8295.00
Negaunee Public Schools 1059.00 6240.00 271.00 7679.00
Powell Township School District 13065.00 1090.00 885.00 15051.00
Republic Michigamme Schools 5802.00 5192.00 715.00 11758.00
Wells Township School District 17029.00 557.00 975.00 18590.00
Marquette City School District 2360.00 5121.00 296.00 7778.00
Ishpeming Public School District 1009.00 6690.00 427.00 8263.00
North Star Academy 944.00 7616.00 2400.00 10960.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
N.I.C.E. Community Schools 1332.00 6659.00 244.00 8250.00
Gwinn Area Community Schools 1473.00 6261.00 388.00 8167.00
Negaunee Public Schools 1151.00 6379.00 238.00 7876.00
Powell Township School District 16446.00 950.00 549.00 17998.00
Republic Michigamme Schools 5994.00 4611.00 521.00 11326.00
Wells Township School District 18409.00 226.00 2144.00 20910.00
Marquette City School District 2607.00 5308.00 246.00 8184.00
Ishpeming Public School District 748.00 7032.00 430.00 8380.00
North Star Academy 463.00 7256.00 1360.00 19186.00

Menominee County Data

Introduction

Menominee County, located in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, was founded in 1861 (Menominee County of Michigan, n.d.). Nine members compose the governmental structure for the county board (Menominee County of Michigan, n.d.). Located on the Southern most part of the Upper Peninsula and on the Wisconsin border, Menominee County is also known as where the best of Michigan begins,  (Menominee county of Michigan, n.d.).

Resources and Assets

There is no better place to work, live, or play. Among the genial atmosphere of the community a vast array of recreational activities are at one’s disposal. Camping, hunting, fishing, and snowmobiling can be enjoyed within Menominee County.

With a population of 23,791, Menominee County’s has a developed community. A snippet of the Menominee County culture can observed through Concerts in the Park, every Thursday evening in the summer, the annual Waterfront festival and Brown Trout Derby.  Menominee County offers numerous opportunities for the pursuit of higher education through, Northern Michigan University, Bay de Noc College, Lake Superior Stat University, and Michigan Tech University. Menominee County also has the opportunity to work with different college within Wisconsin, these in University of Wisconsin Marinette, and NWTC.  With Menominee County’s extensive educational opportunities and culturally aware community, shows that it is indeed growing.

Areas for Advancement

Currently, Menominee County is rapidly growing. Additionally the county would do well with another manufacturer in the area. Another manufacturing company or factory could do well in the community but faces transportation limitations from the geographical location and northern climate. As of now, the county doesn’t necessarily have a wide assortment of job opportunities available to those who have earned advanced degrees; this shows an opportunity for potential growth. Combining an increase in employment opportunities with additional education would demonstrate an improvement of More education combined with increased employment possibilities would improve the average household income, currently around $40,000 per year.

According to Nancy Douglas, the Director of the Economic Development Corporation for Menominee County, a percentage of people who are in the workforce for Menominee County tend to only have high school diplomas (46.40%). While only 20.20 percent have some form of a college background or technical training.

What is next for Menominee County?

At Menominee County’s April board meeting the Spalding Township Supervisor, Jim Moraska, gave a presentation about a possible future partnership of BAMC and Aurora Healthcare. The topic of an emergency policy needs to be instated because hazardous toxic chemical spill in Powers the previous week. There were also proceedings of an equalization session for the Board of Commissioners and a discussion about the possible hiring of an Emergency Manager to keep the board responsible for what they are doing (Menominee County of Michigan, n.d.).

Conclusion

Delta County has many untapped resources. Educational opportunities are abundant, but are not currently being used as job prospects, which results in a labor force with little use of the education that can give so much potential to this county. To improve in these areas, Menominee’s strengths in education, recreation and existing businesses should be employed. By entwining the county’s strengths and conquering any vulnerability, Menominee County will continue to persevere as an eminent community throughout Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

Resources

  • Douglas, Nancy. (31. March 2014).
  • City of Menominee. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://www.cityofmenominee.org
  • Menominee County of Michigan. (n.d.).
    Retrieved from http://www.menomineecounty.com
  • Menominee county. (n.d).
    Retrieved from http://www.usa.com/menominee
  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 550,104 569,516 604,652 624,652  
  Population (persons) 25,115 25,094 25,091 24,892  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 21,903 22,695 24,108 25,094  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings 1,795 2,783 5,544 8,404  
  Private Earnings 231,939 241,804 249,828 253,740  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 4,733 5,143 5,182 5,396  
  Mining 86 117 169 196  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 11,804 12,924 15,208 14,960  
  Wholesale Trade 8,396 8,959 10,334 10,429  
  Retail Trade 20,176 19,504 18,752 19,350  
  Government and Government Enterprise 84,759 89,948 91,776 94,821  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 11,825 11,792 11,816 11,001  
  Wage and Salary employment 9,158 9,046 8,966 9,031  
  Proprietors Employment 2,667 2,746 2,850 2,960  
  Farm Employment 557 554 555 546  
  NonFarm Employment 11,268 11,238 11,261 11,445  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 8,779 8,626 8,699 8,918  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 312 277 293 288  
  Mining 0 10 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 497 529 552 545  
  Wholesale Trade 266 277 316 326  
  Retail Trade 1,116 1,106 1,069 1,095  
  Government and Government Enterprise 2,489 2,612 2,562 2,527  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 5,670 5,561 5,492 5,412  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 732 815      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     11.80%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 6.2 6.2 5.8 5.2 6.3
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Chip Inn Island Resort/Caisno Harris 700
Emerson Electric Co Menominee 500
Lloyd-Flanders Industrics Inc Menominee 400
Menominee Area Public Schools Menominee 325

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Carney nadeau Public Schools

857.00

6232.00

570.00

7700.00

Menominee Area Public Schools

914.00

6019.00

185.00

7157.00

North Central Area Schools

1109.00

6258.00

1421.00

8823.00

Stephenson Area Public Schools

1100.00

5949.00

838.00

8048.00

Nah Tah Wahsh Public School Academy

8996.00

7440.00

201.00

16638.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Carney nadeau Public Schools 933.00 6625.00 492.00 8136.00
Menominee Area Public Schools 650.00 6614.00 779.00 9211.00
North Central Area Schools 870.00 6202.00 1167.00 8239.00
Stephenson Area Public Schools 932.00 5953.00 225.00 7109.00
Nah Tah Wahsh Public School Academy 1336.00 6250.00 827.00 8437.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Carney nadeau Public Schools 938.00 6281.00 393.00 7613.00
Menominee Area Public Schools 1111.00 6099.00 209.00 7446.00
North Central Area Schools 1205.00 6080.00 1310.00 8702.00
Stephenson Area Public Schools 1300.00 5986.00 359.00 7726.00

Ontonagon County Data

Introduction

Ontonagon County is located in the western end of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The governmental structure consists of a ten member county commission seated in the village of Ontonagon. Located on Lake Superior in close proximity to Porcupine Mountain State Park, it is a rural destination for many tourists.

Resources and Assets

Ontonagon County boasts affordable housing, with a median gross rent of $415 and an average house price of $69,749. This is an asset for companies looking to relocate employees, especially those with families. Workforce development opportunities exist for both current and potential residents with the presence of two vocational and technical training centers located within the county hosted at the Ontonagon and Ewen-Trout Creek schools. Training certifications are conducted in the areas of accounting, health care, construction trades, management services and computer programming. Additional opportunities for professional development, as well as employment prospects for spouses, exist at the two universities and one community college located within a three hour radius.

Ontonagon County’s natural features offer destination marketing opportunities directed at state, national and international visitors. Situated on miles of Lake Superior shoreline with direct public access, the county boasts nationally recognized locations like Lake of the Clouds, as well as extensive trail systems for snowmobiling, hiking and biking. A rich cultural history grounded in the mining and lumber industries offer an added attraction manifesting in the numerous historical sites, museums and tours throughout the county.

Areas for Advancement

Recommended areas of advancement focus on education, talent retention, downtown development, continued economic research and extensive marketing. Increasing the availability of career positions that require or prefer advanced degrees will attract potential residents, while dually providing challenging and rewarding growth opportunities for existing residents. Strengthening the relationship between the school district, local employers and Michigan Technological University, Northern Michigan University and Gogebic Community College will cultivate a talent pool with strong local roots to combat a population that has continued to decrease over the past twenty years. Pursuing downtown development opportunities in Ontonagon, the county seat and only village, is recommended as well as in the surrounding communities to create multi-functional places to shop, work, dine and live. In the assessment of such strategies, it will be important to create a centralized and engaged research and development center that frequently and consistently collect, analyze and publish county data that highlight economic amenities and growth. Finally, it is recommended that the county capitalize on its surroundings by increasing niche marketing efforts that draw attention to the pristine natural features Ontonagon County boasts, including the Porcupine Mountain State Park, miles of Lake Superior shoreline and numerous waterfalls, rivers and streams.

Conclusion

Ontonagon County’s proximity to universities and numerous natural charms are strong features attractive to many companies looking to relocate employees. Affordable housing averages are particularly attractive to families and young employees, although permanent employment for individuals with advanced degrees is lacking. With public and private investment, Ontonagon County’s many strengths can be leveraged to overcome those areas needing to be developed.

  2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 164,031 169,955 184,188 190,676  
  Population (persons) 7,692 7,583 7,488 7,330  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 21,325 22,413 24,598 26,013  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -255 0 204 476  
  Private Earnings 60,436 64,554 67,576 70,766  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 3,012 3,449 3,118 3,026  
  Mining 86 117 169 196  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 6,249 7,677 9,614 7,664  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 0  
  Retail Trade 7,249 7,215 7,701 7,870  
  Government and Government Enterprise 26,015 26,771 28,499 28,387  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 3,250 3,250 3,305 3,373  
  Wage and Salary employment 2,433 2,433 2,432 2,471  
  Proprietors Employment 817 817 873 902  
  Farm Employment 131 131 129 127  
  NonFarm Employment 3,119 3,119 3,176 3,246  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 2,425 2,425 2,491 2,582  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 141 141 125 113  
  Mining 0 0 0 0  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 232 232 325 272  
  Wholesale Trade 0 0 0 0  
  Retail Trade 445 445 448 464  
  Government and Government Enterprise 694 694 685 664  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 1,438 1,357 1,306 1,265  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 201 204      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     11.80%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 7.4 7.90 7.7 7.3 7.8
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Stone Container Corp Ontonagon 281
Weekly Bulletin Ontonagon 18
Ontonagon Herald Co Ontonagon 8
Double D Printing Inc Blue Crossing 7

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Ewen-Trout Creek Consolidated Schools

1970.00

5752.00

1232.00

8974.00

Ontonagon Area Schools

1616.00

5412.00

390.00

7978.00

White Pine School District        

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Ewen-Trout Creek Consolidated Schools 1168.00 6144.00 471.00 7847.00
Ontonagon Area Schools 8941.00 6951.00 98.00 15990.00
White Pine School District 2501.00 5585.00 1374.00 9501.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Ewen-Trout Creek Consolidated Schools 2621.00 5171.00 1277.00 9069.00
Ontonagon Area Schools 2550.00 5690.00 421.00 8862.00
White Pine School District 4628.00 4191.00 681.00 9499.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Ewen-Trout Creek Consolidated Schools 2829.00 4977.00 1396.00 9202.00
Ontonagon Area Schools 2358.00 5602.00 341.00 8301.00
White Pine School District - - - -

Strengths and Areas for Improvement

Demographics           

Schoolcraft County is in a rural area, with approximately 8,247 residents living within its 1,171 square miles, it has just 7.2 persons per square mile (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.). Manistique, the county seat, is the only incorporated city in the county. The county is run by a board of five county commissioners, along with a county clerk, road commission, drain commissioner and treasurer (Schoolcraft County, n.d.).

The median household incoming is $37,468 with an average of 2.27 people per household and a homeownership rate of 85.6 percent, which is more than 12 percent above the Michigan average (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.). Although the U.S. Census Bureau states that the median value of owner-occupied housing units is $86,300 (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.), local residents state that a majority of houses in the county can be purchased for approximately $30,000 or rented for less than $400 per month (P. Garber, personal communication, April 25, 2013).

The population is split nearly even in male to female ratio, being recorded as 87 percent white and 9.1 percent Native American; only 1.3 percent of the population is recorded as foreign born (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.).

Strengths

The strengths of Schoolcraft County, which contribute to the quality of life, are amazing for the size and location of their area. They have recreational opportunities available during all seasons, which includes beautiful trails for biking, hiking and snowmobiling. Schoolcraft County is an attractive place to visit or to live.

Hiawatha National Forest is located in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and the northwest part of Schoolcraft County, which is wild and scenic. This is a great place for fun activities throughout the entire year. They have campsites, trails for hiking, biking, snowmobiling, bodies of water and beautiful nature to see (Schoolcraft County, n.d.). It is a versatile and beautiful national forest in the backyard of Schoolcraft County.

Hiawatha National Forest provides a natural resource for the community. It provides income for the city, as well as an enjoyable tourist destination which aids in economic growth of the area. Hiawatha National Forest is a resource that will always be an anchor for Schoolcraft County and is ingrained in the community.

In Schoolcraft County, 83 percent of the population commutes 29 minutes or less to work, with 55 percent of the population commuting less than 15 minutes (USA.com, 2012). This indicates that the majority of the working population live close to their places of employment. This is a strength for the community because people are working where they live and individuals are able to spend more time in the area they live while also spending their money in their own community.

There are two big events that happen every year in Schoolcraft County. The Manistique Folkfest which happens in mid-July and is in its 25th year which is a very unique festival to this part of the country and provides local artists an outlet for their creativity (Schoolcraft County Chamber of Commerce, n.d.). The Schoolcraft County Fair lasts for two days, held at the end of July. The fair is an annual event that is very dear to all members of the community and highlights the best of Schoolcraft County (Schoolcraft County Fair, n.d.).

In Schoolcraft County 89 percent of individuals that are 25 or older have a high school degree or equivalent, meaning there are very few students that do not make it through high school (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.). This bodes well for Schoolcraft County. However, only 12.3 percent of the population over the age of 25 holds a bachelor’s degree or higher (U.S. Census QuickFacts, n.d.). Financially, programs exist that can help students gain training or a higher education. Furthermore, these students need to learn the value of a higher education and what doors it can open for their futures, including trade certifications.

Areas of Improvement 

There is a trade school located in Delta County, a county adjacent to Schoolcraft, which would be a useful tool for recent high school graduates and members of the community to take advantage of and pursue training for a number of fields. The county could benefit from a trained workforce in a number of vocational disciplines. College is not for every individual, but oftentimes trade schools can benefit a community such as Schoolcraft by helping train the workers in the area in a number of needed technical and vocational fields. Formerly, Schoolcraft County had a similar trade school, but it was closed due to it being underutilized (P. Garber, personal communication, April 25, 2013).

There are several grants and scholarships that students can apply for they just need to be able to identify the programs available to them. In most cases, students do not have knowledge of what programs are available to aid them in gaining a higher education or training. This is hard for students who might be first generation college students because they may not have the support of those close to them or previous knowledge readily available.

 Schoolcraft County can move leaps and bounds if we give the future generations the tools that they need to succeed. It is encouraged that the individuals that live in Schoolcraft County seek out vocational training or attend a college or university to obtain a one-year certificate, an associate’s degree or bachelor’s degree. For some, venturing out on their own, away from home, can be scary. But there needs to be a support system in place to aid that transition and help the students of Schoolcraft County live up to their abilities and live their dreams.

Works Cited

  • Schoolcraft County. (n.d.). Elected Officials. Retrieved from http://www.schoolcraftcounty.net/elected_officials_1.asp?Go=schoolcraft
  • Schoolcraft County Chamber of Commerce. (n.d.). Welcome to the Manistique 25th Annual Folk Festival 2014. Retrieved April 28, 2013, from            http://www.schoolcraftcountychamber.org/index.php/manistique-folkfest
  • Schoolcraft County Fair. (n.d.). Schoolcraft County Fair. Retreived April 28, 2013, from   http://www.schoolcraftcountyfair.com
  • U.S. Census Bureau. (2013). State and County QuickFacts: Schoolcraft County, Michigan.            Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/26/26153.html
  • USA.com. (2012). Schoolcraft County Historical Commuting to Work Data. Retrieved April 28,   2013, from http://www.usa.com/schoolcraft-county-mi-income-and-careers--historical            -commuting-to-work-data.htm
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Personal Income (In thousands of dollars)

         
Components by Type          
  Personal Income 186,005 192,241 203,546 209,262  
  Population (persons) 8,779 8,759 8,873 8,779  
  Per Capita peronal income (dollars) 21,187 21,948 22,940 23,837  
Components by Industry          
  Farm Earnings -231 -259 -257 -240  
  Private Earnings 70,773 73,581 79,087 80,526  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 2,745 3,734 4,476 5,087  
  Mining 9,454 10,537 10,619 10,263  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 6,655 7,408 7,315 7,858  
  Wholesale Trade 597 651 0 0  
  Retail Trade 9,822 9,992 10,376 10,286  
  Government and Government Enterprise 38,343 40,466 43,758 45,564  

Employment by Industry

         
Components by Type          
  Total Employment 3,570 3,603 3,737 3,813  
  Wage and Salary employment 2,923 2,926 3,035 3,079  
  Proprietors Employment 647 677 702 734  
  Farm Employment 65 64 64 64  
  NonFarm Employment 3,505 3,539 3,673 3,749  
Components by Industry          
  Private Employment 2,516 2,540 2,667 2,730  
  Forestry, Fishing, Etc 104 116 139 143  
  Mining 121 118 132 139  
  Utilities 0 0 0 0  
  Construction 218 238 233 243  
  Wholesale Trade 26 33 0 0  
  Retail Trade 522 523 524 510  
  Government and Government Enterprise 989 999 1,006 1,019  
             
  Child Population ages 0-17 1,907   1,846 1,768  
  Children in Poverty ages 0-17 299 320      
             
  Poverty (US Census Bureau)     13.40%    
             
  Jobless Rate (in percent) 10 10.90 11 10.6 10.4
             

Principle Employers (Top 4) - 2003

Company Name Location Employees
Manistique Papers Inc Manistique 150
Specialty minerals Inc Gulliver 80
Manistique Dimension-Dry Kiln Manistique 21
Manistique Manufacturing Manistique 19

Funding 02-03

  Local State Fed Total
Manistique Area Schools

1991.00

5256.00

570.00

7856.00

Funding 03-04

  Local State Fed Total
Manistique Area Schools 2090.00 5272.00 685.00 8151.00

Funding 04-05

  Local State Fed Total
Manistique Area Schools 2219.00 5105.00 546.00 8001.00

Funding 05-06

  Local State Fed Total
Manistique Area Schools 2588.00 5246.00 493.00 9420.00