Greetings NMU faculty and welcome to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK, a newsletter created to share current scholarship of teaching and learning related to the virtual learning space, online teaching best practices, EduCat learning management system (LMS) tips and techniques, and to spotlight the exceptional means by which we bring cyber learning to life for our students.

Vol. 2, Issue 14, October 23, 2020

Video conferencing applications, such as Zoom and Skype, have enabled faculty to continue our research, service, and in many cases, teaching responsibilities, online or otherwise, during the pandemic. Some of us are even using Zoom to stay in contact with family and friends because of COVID-19 travel restrictions. Yet, with more screen time and perhaps less physical exertion required by our work, how many of you feel more fatigued than ever? Of course, the stress of the pandemic, itself, may have something to do with this uncharacteristic exhaustion. Another elusive epidemic is concurrently infecting us along with the COVID-19 virus, a form of technological stress called “Zoom fatigue” (Miller, 2020). Zoom fatigue presents itself with symptoms of being tired, overly stressed, or feeling overwhelmed before, during, or after a videoconference meeting.

Causes of Zoom Fatigue

  • The complexity of technology and the need for additional professional development to effectively use it
  • Techno-glitches that arise with the use of technology
  • Staying visually connected to a constantly moving screen and its participants, leading to eye strain and other conditions
  • The need to have complete focus to read facial expressions and body language
  • Having to concentrate on voices if attendees do not use their camera
  • Trying to pay attention to a meeting while keeping family members or pets quiet or out of the camera’s view, a work-life invasion
  • Having to be on top of your game throughout a meeting because you are visible to all attendees
  • With the use of Zoom, more meetings can be conducted in a given workday as compared to the pre-COVID world since attendees can easily switch from one meeting to the next, which means that we may not leave our desks for extended periods of time.
  • Our offices may not be ergonomic in their design.

How to Overcome Zoom Fatigue
Fosslien and Duffy (2020) provide several suggestions to overcome Zoom fatigue.

  1. Close any other programs or tabs (like email) which are open to avoid trying to multitask while in a meeting. Multitasking can tap mental energy, decrease productivity, and increase stress.
  2. Take mini breaks and rest your eyes. Look away from the screen for a few seconds or minimize the open windows.
  3. Hide yourself from your own view on the screen as meeting participants tend to spend too much time watching themselves.
  4. Encourage attendees to use a plain background to eliminate distractions from other people’s offices or rooms.
  5. Try to incorporate a mix of meetings via conference call in lieu of another Zoom meeting.

Students and Zoom Fatigue
Students may also be subject to Zoom fatigue. With COVID-19 altering nearly every aspect of our lives, students may need as much support, if not more than faculty, to cope with virtual classroom stress. Mayo (2020) offers the following tips to assist students with Zoom fatigue:

  • Provide a planned agenda for each class to help the students stay on track
  • Use an image or slide to easily transition from one topic to the next
  • Advise students to turn off other programs which may cause video to freeze, therefore leading to frustration and stress
  • Students should be encouraged to read assignments and prepare any questions in advance of the Zoom meeting to ensure active participation
  • Create activities such as group discussions so students are not merely listening to a lecture
  • Encourage students to take notes or perform some other activity so they keep their minds engaged to promote learning new content and connecting it with other knowledge areas
  • Give students quick stretch breaks allowing them to turn their cameras off for that short time and provide a specific amount of time for the break
  • Discourage multitasking as this may cause stress from trying to focus on class and whatever else they are doing
  • Stay focused on the students by turning off your camera’s self-view   

For questions regarding how to use the many features of Zoom and incorporate learning activities and/or assessments with this information and communication technologies (ICT) phenomenon, please PLEASE contact me at sboyerda@nmu.edu or reach out to the Center for Teaching and Learning, (906) 227-2483, ctl@nmu.edu. Many Zoom resources and how-to videos are available as part of the Modified On-Campus Teaching Toolkit.

https://www.nmu.edu/ctl/modified-campus-teaching-toolkit

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends. Let’s work together to minimize our Zoom fatigue and that of our students!

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar
*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Denworth, L. (2020). Why Zoom fatigue is real and what you can do about it. Psychology Today. Retrieved October 25, 2020 from https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/brain-waves/202007/why-zoom-fatigue-is-real-and-what-you-can-do-about-it

Fosslien, L. & Duffy, M. W. (2020). How to combat Zoom fatigue. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved October 25, 2020 from https://hbr.org/2020/04/how-to-combat-zoom-fatigue

Mayo, F. (2020). Help students combat Zoom fatigue. Mayo’s Clinic Center for the Advancement of Food Service Education. Retrieved October 25, 2020 from https://www.cafemeetingplace.com/mayo-s-clinics/item/2224-help-students-combat-zoom-fatigue

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 13, October 16, 2020

This week’s BYTE gives a shout out to the Teaching and Learning Advisory Council (TLAC), a major standing committee of the Academic Senate, and their excellent work to develop an online course design and delivery peer observation process for our faculty, now available!

The TLAC online course observation program was cultivated over the last three semesters by the 2019-2020 and 2020-2021 committees, in tandem with the Teaching Scholar, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement Scholar, and an instructional design representative from the Center for Teaching and Learning. The TLAC online course observation process, consistent with the in-person course observation system already in place, provides faculty with formative feedback regarding their e-courses. The TLAC online course observation program was designed to align with the Global Campus online course design review process, Quality Matters, and best teaching practices. The TLAC observation process does not replace the Global Campus review and will keep in step with the scaffolding of the Global Campus review process as we continue to advance quality expectations over the next several years.

To request an online course observation by one of the TLAC committee members or its highly qualified peer observers, please click on the link below:

TLAC Observation Request Form

The Global Campus online course design review system continues its work. We are in the process of reviewing Fall 2020 syllabi copies now and providing summative (and formative) feedback. This Winter, we begin our work to advance quality standards and shift to reviewing archived online courses. We will advance to this important step by piloting several departments to start including SELPS, Clinical Lab Sciences, and Psychology.

For questions regarding how to request a TLAC peer observation or to clarify any of the steps or quality standards of the Global Campus Online Course Design Review process, PLEASE contact me at sboyerda@nmu.edu.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar
*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 12, October 9, 2020

This week’s BYTE is focused on writing measurable learning objectives, an integral part of high-quality course design.

What are Learning Objectives?
Learning objectives serve as the road map to the expected learning in a course. Faculty and students, alike, utilize this mapping system to chart the longitude and latitude of learning, so that students can ask “where am I?” and “where do I still have to go” in the learning process. Faculty, then, plot learning using these objectives as the guide by means of activities and then measure the distance remaining to learning with assessments. Once learning objectives are conceptualized, the critical work of writing of them begins. Planning learning before a course begins is the first step to writing learning objectives, which entails determining what students should know or be able to do at the conclusion of a course and each learning module (week, unit, etc.).

Writing Measurable Learning Objectives
These statements, penned in a concise manner, describe what learners should be able to comprehend or demonstrate at the end of the time period so as to exhibit competence or mastery of a given objective. Common miss-steps in writing learning objectives are usually found in the performance statement in measuring the learning outcome(s). Statement mistakes take the form of using incorrect verbs such as “appreciate”, “know”, “understand”, and “comprehend”. These verbs are not measurable. Careful consideration must be taken when selecting verbs to properly describe how students will display learning. Some replacement verbs are “describe” instead of “know”, “list” in place of “understand”, or “explain” rather than “appreciate.”

For example, objectives may state that students are to “describe” all the safety precautions necessary for battling COVID-19 in a hospital setting, “list” the ways in which hackers can penetrate a network security system, or “explain” how the criminal justice system helps to protect citizen’s rights. Learning objectives should be measurable and verbs such as “appreciate” do not have quantifiable outcomes. We, as faculty, cannot see or hear our students’ thoughts to ascertain if they really “know” or “appreciate.” One tool, which is an immensely helpful source to assist with choosing operational verbs, is Bloom’s Taxonomy (1956).

Available on the Global Campus website, Volume 1, Issue 18 of the BYTE (October 14, 2019) reviewed Bloom’s Taxonomy in detail: https://nmu.edu/online/online-byte-week

SAE International has provided a list of verbs for each level of the pyramid: https://www.sae.org/training/seminars/instructorzone/measurable_verbs_for_learning_objectives.pdf

Another scenario is the expectation of a nursing student to “know” how to respect a patient. “Knowing” how to respect a patient is not measurable. By converting this objective to “explain” why patients react positively to a nurse actively listening to their concerns, the outcome can, then, be properly measured and learning assessed. Students need to remember material to understand it. Then, by understanding the material, they can then apply (the measurable action) the knowledge, concept, etc.

Walker (2017) expands upon Bloom’s Taxonomy and offers four elements that should be considered when authoring learning objectives, which are:

  1. Audience-Learner Focused Objectives: Learning objectives are stated clearly to allow learners to easily grasp their meaning.
  1. Performance Statement (observable and meaningful behavior): This component must describe what the students will be able to do in order to prove they have met the intent of the objective.
  1. Condition (how the performance is to be completed): Condition statements describe what conditions apply to the performance and include words such as “without”, “given”, and “with” (Walker, 2017). A condition statement in a written objective may be that nursing students must be able to calculate the correct dose of medication for a patient after completing a learning module. In order to satisfy the learning objective, students must perform the calculation using the “given” information, consisting of patient weight and age. Another example is that students will be able to create a financial statement with the “given” information (a trial balance), but “without” the use of notes and textbook.
  1. Criteria (clarifying how well the students must perform the completed objective): How well can be measured by how long it takes the student(s) to perform the given learning objective, how quickly they can complete it, and/or how accurate the results of their learning performance is. For instance, a nursing student may be asked to measure the correct dose of medication for a patient and do so within one millimeter of accuracy.

For questions regarding how to write measurable learning objectives, one of the evaluative criteria of the Global Campus Online Course Design Review process, PLEASE contact me at sboyerda@nmu.edu.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Bloom, B. S. (1956). Taxonomy of educational objectives: The classification of educational goals. New York, NY: Longmans, Green.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Walker, J. (2017). How to write effective learning objectives. Retrieved from https://www.skillbuilderlms.com/how-to-write-effective-learning-objectives/

Vol. 2, Issue 11, October 2, 2020

On behalf of the Global Campus, a very special thank you to all Northern Michigan University faculty who have taught, are teaching, or are considering teaching in the online learning space. Your dedication to high impact methods to online teaching and learning is sincerely appreciated. As a means of recognizing and celebrating the imaginative approaches, course design and delivery quality, learner satisfaction, and effective online learning outcomes in online learning, this week, the BYTE is seeking nominations for the annual Excellence in Online Teaching Award.

This award recognizes an outstanding individual who has creatively utilized appropriate Internet-based technologies to teach online and/or blended courses in higher education. The recipient must have designed and taught one or more online or blended courses with an imaginative approach, well-designed course materials and instructional strategies, and a demonstrated rapport with the course participants. The recipient must also document effectiveness in achieving desired learning outcomes in the online and/or blended course(s).

Please see the link below for more information including who can nominate or be nominated, the required award documentation, the deadline to nominate, and the selection committee. Recipients of the NMU Excellence in Online Teaching Award will receive a commemorative award and a check for $1,000.

https://nmu.edu/online/excellence-online-teaching-award

Next week, the BYTE will emphasize stress management for online students.

For questions regarding the Excellence in Online Teaching Award, the tech tips published in earlier issues, or to highlight the ingenious pedagogic methods employed this term or in others, PLEASE write to me so that I can share them in upcoming publications of the BYTE, sboyerda@nmu.edu.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 10 & Teaching Tip #14- Sept. 25, 2020

Tips for Teaching

The Teaching BYTE: The Modified On-Campus Course

Since the pandemic will not be over soon and winter semester may look much like it does today, this is our teaching and learning reality.  How can faculty adapt their modified on-campus courses to better meet students’ needs? How can we help students to be successful in modified on-campus courses? The Teaching and Learning Scholar, Dr. Lisa Flood, and the Extended Learning and Community Engagement Scholar, Dr. Stacy Boyer Davis, are collaborating this week to combine a Teaching Tip with an Online BYTE to offer some suggestions to address these concerns. This Teaching BYTE offers the best practices for teaching modified on-campus (or off) courses due to the COVID-19 physical distancing precautions. The pedagogy we provide can be applied now to in-person, modified, or online classes and beyond our current health crisis. We hope that you will find some useful information in our collaborative effort.

As you are aware, due to social distancing requirements, many face-to-face (F2F) courses are not able to have all students meet physically during class periods. In these modified on-campus courses, faculty are using various delivery options, each with strengths and/or unique challenges.

Teaching Dual Audiences Simultaneously (In-Person and via Zoom)

Some faculty are using videoconferencing via Zoom to deliver synchronous content with their remote learners while other students attend in-person on their assigned class days.  Using this method, everyone attends the same class meeting day and time schedule. There is little difference in class preparation with this modified teaching approach as this model is similar to traditional pre-COVID courses. However, faculty are finding it challenging to simultaneously manage their classroom and remote students (Zoomers). Although the in-class students can hear remote students, the Zoomers cannot hear any F2F students’ questions, answers, or participate in their live discussions. In order to convey these in-classroom conversations, the faculty member needs to repeat or paraphrase what was said for the Zoomers. Faculty who use wall-mounted whiteboards or chalkboards are finding the laptop webcam limiting. Finally, it is a challenge to make connections between these two groups of students who may never meet physically.

Hybrid Course Delivery Using a Flipped Classroom Teaching Technique

Some faculty are using another course model called the flipped class. In this model, faculty record lectures or assign primary content (readings, videos, websites), to be completed outside of class before their required in-class attendance. During class, students are engaged in active learning activities such as case studies, problem solving, role playing, or other activities designed to apply the content in relevant ways. The instructor repeats the same in-class activities with students on their assigned class days. Strengths of this model include: 1) students can view/review the lecture as many times as needed, 2) precious in-class time is used to explain difficult concepts and complete application activities, and 3) faculty can focus solely on the F2F students and do not have to manage the remote students and related technology. However, the faculty need to spend additional time recording lectures, creating the out of class assignments, and designing in-class activities that might need to be revised because of physical distancing requirements. For example, students cannot work side by side in small groups, share physical manipulatives, or use wall-mounted white boards. If faculty are requiring pre-class quizzes or other assignments, the due dates may vary for different groups of students.

Hybrid Course Delivery Using a Modified Flipped Classroom Teaching Technique

The third popular delivery model is the partial flipped course. In this model, the faculty pre-record some lectures reserving class time for more critical concepts or difficult content. The same in-class lectures are delivered F2F but on separate days to each group of students while both groups watch or complete the same online assignments. Similar to the hybrid flipped model, the modified flipped model also requires additional faculty preparation time to record or create the online assignments and manage different due dates. 

Regardless of which deliver model or combination of models you are using, faculty are likely being challenged this semester. Because students may need to isolate and/or quarantine, faculty might elect to use Zoom for each in-class session. Faculty may also need to isolate or quarantine at any time, which further adds to the stress. Students are reporting being confused with the different course delivery methods and are finding it difficult to pay attention while on Zoom. They are also struggling to keep track of assignments and are stressed out in general due to the pandemic and national events.

Regarding specific teaching challenges, we have compiled a list below of suggestions and resources to assist faculty to address instruction in modified on-campus courses.

Modified On-Campus Teaching Toolkit

A smorgasbord of helpful resources and videos, A-Z, nuts to bolts, modified on-campus teaching including EduCat tools, creating and grading quizzes, VoiceThread, Respondus Monitor, using Zoom, etc. https://www.nmu.edu/ctl/modified-campus-teaching-toolkit

Managing F2F (classroom) and Remote (Zoom) Students

Provide a recorded overview of your course including a ‘guided tour’ of EduCat resources and assignments.  See examples of course overviews and best teaching practices in the Faculty EduCat Showcase. https://educat.nmu.edu/moodle2/course/view.php?id=11927.

You will need to enroll by entering the code: nmufaculty

Pre-Recording Lectures

CTL’s Resource Library: Camtasia, VoiceThread, and Wildcast Podcasting

https://www.nmu.edu/ctl/ctl-resource-library

Using Zoom

  • FAQ’s: https://www.nmu.edu/audiovisual/faq
  • Visit the CTL’s Resource Library: Open Zoom Video-conferencing tab which has many resources such as creating an account, setting up a Zoom meeting in EduCat, securing your meeting, recording a session, and managing class sessions
    https://www.nmu.edu/ctl/ctl-resource-library
  • Identify a Remote Student Facilitator: Each class, ask a different student to serve as the Zoom moderator to confirm audio, report on document sharing, and monitor the chat questions.  In addition, encourage that student to remind you if you forget to ‘relay’ in-class discussion to the remote group.

Replacing Wall-Mounted Whiteboards and Blackboards

Classroom Equipment Issues

In-room problems, call for AV assistance for real time help: (906) 227-2290.

Schedule 1:1 consultation in your classroom or with AV staff

https://www.nmu.edu/classrooms/request-equipment-and-assistance

Best Virtual Classroom Practices

https://www.nmu.edu/classrooms/sites/DrupalClassrooms/files/UserFiles/Files/PDF/virtclassroompractices.pdf

Connecting Classroom and Remote Students

  • EduCat Discussion Forums: create a forum for Q & A before an exam or one to address key concepts covered in pre-class assignments (recorded lectures or readings).
  • Zoom Polling: great for formative assessments and to gauge your group’s feelings especially about sensitive topics.
  • Virtual Break-Out Rooms: Have F2F and remote groups join to work collaboratively.
  • Individual Attention: Call on each student by name during synchronous sessions; don’t forget to include the Zoom group.
  • Personal Feedback: consider providing students with audio and/or video comments to make a more personal connection (Glazier, 2020).

Interactive Learning Activities

  • Think Break: ask students to reflect on a question and after a period of time, have them weigh in together via Zoom breakout rooms and then report to the class.
  • Empty Outlines: if using a flipped classroom, supply students with an empty outline and ask them to fill it out after watching the assigned out of class video or completing readings.
  • Tournament: divide the class into several groups and announce a competition for the most points earned on a practice test.  Points should carry from round to round over a given learning module.  Consider aligning in-person students with Zoom students to bring the class together.
  • Brain Drain: divide students into groups of 5 or 6.  Provide a prompt to brainstorm.  Each person is to brainstorm at least one answer.  Have students rotate the brainstorm to another group.  This activity can be administered using Zoom breakout rooms and Google docs.
  • TV Commercial: In groups, students create a minute long TV commercial for the subject currently under discussion and ask them to act it out in class.  Zoom, VoiceThread, Camtasia – all the tech tools can be used to accomplish this activity whether in-person, online, or hybrid.
  • Press Conference: Enable students with the opportunity to role-play as the media to ask questions of the professor, expert on the topic. 

Additional Resources and Help

The ideas and tools listed above are intended to get you started on building and delivering a modified on-campus course, but this information is not comprehensive. If you would like assistance to help design or deliver your course this semester, please contact your CTL Liaison, the Teaching and Learning Scholar, or the Extended Learning and Community Engagement Scholar to discuss possibilities.   

Faculty who have questions about or would like assistance with the tools mentioned on this page should contact the Center for Teaching and Learning at ctl@nmu.edu or 227-2483.

For questions on any of these tech tips or to highlight the ingenious methods that you employed this semester for modified, hybrid, blended, flex, etc., PLEASE write to Stacy (sboyerda@nmu.edu) and Lisa (lflood@nmu.edu).  If something did NOT work and was a complete failure in the modified learning environment, please share! We can all benefit from discussing our successes and missteps. The next Online BYTE of the Week will showcase what has worked and what hasn’t in our modified teaching approach.  The next Teaching Tip will highlight strategies for helping students to succeed in your modified on-campus course. Your contributions are needed to write both upcoming newsletters. Thank-you!

Stay healthy, safe, and strong, faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar

Lisa
CTL Teaching- Learning Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987).  The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor.  Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2).  For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Crook, A. E., & Crook, T. W. (2020, August 26). 6 tips for teaching online and in person simultaneously. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2020/08/26/strategies-teaching-online-and-person-simultaneously-opinion

Glazier, R. A. (2020, July 6). A shift to online classes this fall could lead to a retention crisis. EdSurg. https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-07-06-a-shift-to-online-classes-this-fall-could-lead-to-a-retention-crisis

Schwartz, S. (2020, August 5). How to make lessons cohesive when teaching both remote and in-person classes. Education Week. https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2020/08/06/how-to-make-lessons-cohesive-when-teaching.html

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

VanGundy, A. (2005). 101 activities for teaching creativity and problem solving. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

Watkins, R. (2005). 75 e-learning activities: Making online learning interactive.  San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

Vol. 2, Issue 9, September 11, 2020

Last week, the BYTE took a pause to honor and celebrate the historic sacrifice of American workers who struggled and suffered in intolerable conditions, toiling at least 12 hours per day for low pay without breaks, paid sick days, vacation days, or health care, before the formation and organization of labor unions. Through the bloody Haymarket Square affair and Pullman Strike demonstrations in 1886 and 1894, respectively, these industrial revolutionary heroes made possible the labor rights that we value and benefit from today. To the ongoing work of the labor unions on campus and off who continue this legacy, thank you for your endeavors.

Today marks the 19th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks. Now known as Patriot Day, we remember the nearly 3,000 innocent victims of terrorism and commemorate their lives. We pay tribute to the bravery of first responders. To honor them, consider performing an act of kindness, philanthropy, or community service.

As fans of the BYTE club, (we should have t-shirts made), our readership recently wrapped up a four-part series on trauma-induced teaching strategies. During this month-long study, we embarked on the fall 2020 term, one of the most challenging but inspiring semesters of our professoriate careers. With the safety and security of our students and the entire academic community and society as a whole in mind, we completely transformed how we teach, where we teach, and even when we teach, no small feat to say the least. We should be extraordinarily proud of our continued accomplishments, faculty. Job well done.

While the faculty may already have a seating chart and attendance mechanism in place for contact tracing purposes this term, the BYTE offers a few tech apps to automate this process and provide some time saving techniques. These tools have in-person class implications yet they can be used with modification in online asynchronous or synchronous learning environments.

EduCat:

There are a couple of ways to take attendance in EduCat. The first is to add an ‘Attendance Activity.’ The steps are as follows:

  1. Turn editing on.
  2. Select ‘Add an activity or resource.’
  3. Select ‘Attendance.’

As many attendance sessions as needed for the semester can be added to a given course. To set the attendance options, click on the Attendance activity and select “Add session” as seen below.

Add Session

Faculty can opt for students to record their own attendance. This is a choice when adding a session.

Student Recording

The next step is to add attendance categories and grading options. Again, from the Attendance activity, select “Status set.” Attendance descriptions and even grading points can be added to the activity. Default settings are “present,” “late,” “excused,” and “absent.”

Status Set

Student Status

To take attendance using the Attendance feature of EduCat, click on the arrow button pointing to the right beneath the Actions menu, below. All students in the EduCat class will populate. Faculty can select from the menu whether each student was present, late, excused, or absent.

Menu

If students are permitted to self-report their attendance, another option is to use a QR code containing a URL that students can scan with a mobile device, which directs them to the attendance page to record their attendance. Please see below for instructions to set up a QR code.

Student Recording

Reports can be generated for each attendance session by selecting the attendance activity, clicking on the Export tab, changing the Export settings if needed along with the formatting options.

Faculty may opt out of the EduCat Attendance feature and instead use the system’s activity logs to identify when students have accessed the system to complete an activity, for example, as a mechanism to track attendance.

Be Seated:

A free app that lets faculty create a classroom roster with names, photos, and seating assignments. The app even enables randomly assigned seating. We can track attendance and more.

Smart Seat:
A $4.99 app purchase, seating charts can be created using a grid, attendance can be recorded and exported. Attendance records can also be exported to email.

All Here:
A $0.99 app purchase, similar to Smart Seat including memory games to help faculty remember their students during the first few weeks of classes.

Teacher Aide:

Designed by a teacher, this app is more than an attendance and seating chart solution. Faculty can utilize its gradebook feature and sync it with Google classrooms.

One-Tap:
An app used by organizations, universities, and sports teams including the Toronto Maple Leafs for event attendance. This app provides several options for attendance tracking including a check in web link for students to sign in using their mobile devices, a QR pass that can be distributed via text message and scanned by students, and other traditional attendance tracking methods.

Google Classrooms:

Faculty could utilize a Google doc for attendance purposes, or, if incorporating a Google classroom, set an attendance assignment poll question.

Zoom Poll or Attendance Report:

Consider creating a Zoom poll or download the Zoom attendance report for documentation purposes.

For questions on any of these tech tips or to highlight the ingenious methods that you employed this term for seating charts and attendance, PLEASE write to me so that I can share them in the next issue of the BYTE, sboyerda@nmu.edu.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 8, August 28, 2020

This week is our final BYTE of the 4-part series related to trauma informed teaching practices. Part 4 is a review of the literature and high impact methods to avoid second-hand trauma stress exposure when working with those who are trauma-affected, learners or otherwise.  The learning objectives for these professional development pieces include:

  1. Volume 2, Issue 5: Define trauma, describe its pervasiveness, and explain the effects on learning and development.
  2. Volume 2, Issue 6: Recognize signs of trauma in our students.
  3. Volume 2, Issue 7: Apply teaching practices to work effectively with those experiencing trauma.
  4. Volume 2, Issue 8: Develop competencies to avoid secondary traumatic stress when working with trauma-affected learners. 

A word of caution and a disclaimer that this newsletter will contain disturbing content and may be very difficult for some to read, prompting feelings of stress, anxiety, and re-traumatization. 

Methods to Avoid Secondary Traumatic Stress

The faculty at Northern Michigan University are some of the most dedicated and selfless educators in higher learning today.  Our faculty fully and completely commit to placing our students and teaching responsibilities first, well before our other professional and personal responsibilities.  As caring and compassionate faculty, engaging with our students is the norm.  Because we openly exhibit empathy and kindness, students will trust us for guidance in areas beyond academics.  Through these interactions, students may open up and reveal their traumas. 

Many of us have not received formal training to distinguish the signs of trauma or to know how our students’ pain and suffering may affect us.  Without the appropriate professional development to learn how to maintain emotional boundaries, we may find ourselves predisposed to secondary trauma stress (Devilly, Wright, & Varker, 2009; Rodenbush, 2015).  Secondary trauma stress is a work-related hazard in higher education.  Signals of secondary trauma stress, also known as vicarious trauma or compassion fatigue, include (Hensel, Ruiz, Finney, & Dewa, 2015):

  • Anxiety
  • Sleep problems
  • Anger
  • Irritation
  • Moodiness
  • Constant worry
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increased appetite
  • Diminished feelings of satisfaction
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Suspicion and blaming others
  • Thinking about trauma

Strategies to Moderate Secondary Trauma Stress

Faculty should know that vicarious trauma is not a personality flaw or weakness but a consequence of caring.  We must protect ourselves from assuming our students’ pain as our own so that we can continue to support our students.  Self-care activities are recommended to moderate secondary trauma stress including mindfulness activities, reflection, meditation, exercise, rest, journaling and a balanced diet (Lee, Gottfried, & Bride, 2017).  Other strategies to maintain a healthy emotional balance when working with traumatized students consist of making time for family, fun, or leisure pursuits and laughing (Shannon et al., 2014).  In addition, we should seek professional counseling if they feel they need to talk about their feelings or stress indicators are persistent or worsen.

Dr. Christy Hartline explains, “setting boundaries does not mean that we no longer care about what is going on, but rather, it is being respectful of our own needs in addition to the students' needs.”  She offers an Inside Higher Ed article that reinforces her professional advice.

https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2015/11/04/setting-boundaries-when-it-comes-students-emotional-disclosures-essay 

About NMU Counseling and Consultation Services
Northern Michigan University Counseling and Consultation Services is located upstairs in the C. B. Hedgcock Building in room 3405. They offer counseling and psychological services that facilitate students' personal development to participate more successfully in the NMU living and learning community.

Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the academic year. Summer hours are in accordance with University schedule. All currently enrolled students are eligible for free and confidential Counseling and Consultation Services. 

Due to COVID-19, all Counseling and Consultations Services will be provided through Telehealth. Please call (906) 227-2980 to schedule an appointment. 

Professional psychologists and counselors provide focused individual counseling, group counseling, and psycho-educational presentations. In addition, emotional crisis appointments are available daily for students who feel an urgent need for support.

The professional staff are objective, non-judgmental guides to assist students in overcoming both long-standing and immediate problems. They strive to help students develop new skills and perspectives to enrich their lives.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

DeVilly, G. J., Wright, R., & Varker, T. (2009). Vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress or simply burnout? Effect of trauma therapy on mental health professionals. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 43(4), 373-385.

Hensel, J. M., Ruiz, C., Finney, C., & Dewa, C. S. (2015). Meta-analysis of risk factors for secondary trauma stress in therapeutic work with trauma victims: Secondary traumatic stress risk factors. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 28(2), 83-91.

Lee, J. J., Gottfried, R., & Bride, B. E. (2017). Exposure to client trauma, secondary traumatic stress, and the health of clinical social workers: A mediation analysis. Client Social Work Journal, 46(3), 228-235.

Rodenbush, K. (2015). The effects of trauma on behavior in the classroom.  Journal of Traumatic Stress, 26(3), 299-309.

Shannon, P. J., Simmelink-McCleary, J., Im, H. Becher, E., & Crook-Lyon, R. E. (2014). Developing self-care practices in trauma treatment course. Journal of Social Work Education, 50(3), 440-453.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 7, August 21, 2020

This week, the BYTE resumes the four-part study related to trauma informed teaching practices. Part 3 offers the faculty trauma-informed teaching classroom strategies supported by the literature.

The learning objectives for these professional development pieces include:

  1. Volume 2, Issue 5: Define trauma, describe its pervasiveness, and explain the effects on learning and development.
  1. Volume 2, Issue 6: Recognize signs of trauma in our students.
  1. Volume 2, Issue 7: Apply teaching practices to work effectively with those experiencing trauma.
  1. Volume 2, Issue 8: Develop competencies to avoid secondary traumatic stress when working with trauma-affected learners.

A word of caution and a disclaimer as the next several weeks will contain disturbing content and may be very difficult for some to read, prompting feelings of stress, anxiety, and re-traumatization.

Trauma-Informed Teaching Practices

Disclaimers
The research conducted by Perkins and Graham-Bermann (2012) prompts faculty to consider that students carry their lived experiences with them into our classrooms including those that were or are traumatic. One approach to avoid triggering a traumatic response when subjecting students to sensitive content is to give advanced notice, as I did in the former paragraph. This simple statement, either verbal or written, is a thoughtful way that we can help our students to prepare themselves for upsetting subject matter.

Classroom Structure
Another consideration, not only for interactions with students subjected to trauma but a general instructional best practice, is to provide clear expectations, regular communication, consistency, and a well-designed class structure. Uncertainty can heighten emotional stressors, insecurity, and prompt re-traumatization. Trauma-informed faculty should also consider empowering their students with some form of agency, perhaps with the opportunity to choose between assessments or class participation methods, as is the foundation of universal design for learning concepts, the subject of a future BYTE (Tobin & Behling, 2018). Students who feel more in control of their learning environment are less likely to engage in undesirable behaviors (Carello & Butler, 2014).

Fostering a Positive and Interactive Learning Environment
Learner-learner and learner-instructor interaction opportunities in the classroom take on an entirely new meaning for the traumatized. These types of interfaces can foster relationships, create new outlets for support, and enable students with a safe space to practice social-emotional skills if they feel comfortable doing so. Trauma-aware faculty are caring, compassionate, and mindful; they create a positive learning environment, which sends the message that they are empathetic, helpful to their students, and will assure their well-being in the classroom (Schaefer & Nooner, 2017; Tough, 2016). This encouragement is critical to building trust with traumatized students. As we know from the last several issues of the BYTE, those who are exposed to a painful event take longer to trust others.

Emphasizing Resources
Consider a reference to Counseling Services in course syllabi and web links to resources in the online classroom (Smyth, Hockemeyer, Heron, Wonderlich, & Pennebaker, 2008). Perhaps, as part of the first day of activities, a syllabus quiz could include a few questions about Counseling Services or faculty could, as part of their introductory videos, record a segment related to them. Emphasize that counseling is available to all NMU students, including those who attend remotely.

About NMU Counseling and Consultation Services
Northern Michigan University Counseling and Consultation Services is located upstairs in the C. B. Hedgcock Building in room 3405. They offer counseling and psychological services that facilitate students' personal development to participate more successfully in the NMU living and learning community.

Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. during the academic year. Summer hours are in accordance with University schedule. All currently enrolled students are eligible for free and confidential Counseling and Consultation Services. 

Due to COVID-19, all Counseling and Consultations Services will be provided through Telehealth. Please call (906) 227-2980 to schedule an appointment. 

Professional psychologists and counselors provide focused individual counseling, group counseling, and psycho-educational presentations. In addition, emotional crisis appointments are available daily for students who feel an urgent need for support.

The professional staff are objective, non-judgmental guides to assist students in overcoming both long-standing and immediate problems. They strive to help students develop new skills and perspectives to enrich their lives.

Some of the common issues that students bring to counseling are depressed and anxious feelings, family difficulties, personal crises, coping with loss, and other impediments to personal and academic functioning. They also aid with self-esteem, self-acceptance, identity and sexuality difficulties, as well as healing from the effects of sexual assault/abuse, suicidal thoughts and other destabilizing experiences.

Staff provides consultation to a variety of NMU personnel and departments. They offer guidance to students, staff and faculty to recognize and cope with signs of distress in others.

Dial HELP crisis hotline is available 24/7 for free, confidential, non-judgmental crisis intervention and referral services:

CALL: (906) 482-4357

TEXT: (906) 356-3337

CHAT: dialhelp.org

All students, faculty, and staff have access to TAO (Therapy Assistance Online). It is another great self-help resource, “an engaging, interactive program to learn life skills and to help bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life.” TAO includes educational modules, assessments, practice tools and logs, and a mindfulness library.

Next week, we will finalize our trauma-informed teaching practices study with a piece that helps us as faculty to prevent our acquisition of secondary trauma stress when working with trauma-affected learners.

A very special thank you to Dr. Christine Hartline; her significant knowledge and expertise in this space has been utilized to guide this professional development series regarding trauma.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.


For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Carello, J., & Butler, J. D. (2014). Potentially perilous pedagogies: Teaching trauma is not the same as trauma-informed teaching. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 15(2), 153-168.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Perkins, S., & Graham-Bermann, S. (2012). Violence exposure and the development of school-related functioning: Mental health, neurocognition, and learning. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 17(1), 89-98.

Schaefer, L. M., & Nooner, K. B. (2017). Brain function associated with co-occurring trauma and depression symptoms in college students. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, 26(2), 175-190.

Smyth, J. M., Hockemeyer, J. R., Heron, K. E., Wonderlich, S. A., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2008). Prevalence, type, disclosure, and severity of adverse life events in college students. Journal of American College Health, 57(1), 69-76.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Tobin, T. J., & Behling, K. T. (2018). Reach everyone, teach everyone: Universal design for learning in higher education. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press.

Tough, P. (2016). Helping children succeed: What works and why. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Vol. 2, Issue 6, August 14, 2020

On Monday, August 17, 2020, the Fall 2020 semester begins. Our Wildcats will finally return to the classroom to continue their scholarly journeys, online and otherwise, after an unparalleled five-month in-person hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While energy and excitement on campus are high, feelings of nervousness, stress, and anxiety related to the health care crisis currently at hand understandably eclipse the enthusiasm for many of our students and faculty. This week, the BYTE continues the four part series related to trauma informed teaching practices. Part 2 provides insight into what some of the signs of trauma are and how our students exhibit them in the academic environment.

The learning objectives for these professional development pieces include:

  1. Volume 2, Issue 5: Define trauma, describe its pervasiveness, and explain the effects on learning and development.
  2. Volume 2, Issue 6: Recognize signs of trauma in our students.
  3. Volume 2, Issue 7: Apply teaching practices to work effectively with those experiencing trauma.
  4. Volume 2, Issue 8: Develop competencies to avoid secondary traumatic stress when working with trauma-affected learners.

A word of caution and a disclaimer as the next several weeks will contain disturbing content and may be very difficult for some to read, prompting feelings of stress, anxiety, and re-traumatization.

Signs of Trauma

Before we begin a review of the signs of trauma observed in the classroom, please know that the intention of this newsletter is not to suggest that faculty should diagnose their students or attempt to treat their symptoms. To the contrary, the research presented here should serve as a guide to enhance faculty awareness with respect to the warning signs of student trauma.

Students who have suffered a trauma are often distracted as they are physically and emotionally drained, consumed from the stress of it. Victims of trauma often find themselves habitually scrutinizing their environments for dangers in order to prevent additional occurrences. These students are in a persistent state of trepidation, which inhibits their ability to focus and tap into the magic of intellectual curiosity and exploration of higher learning (Bonanno, Pat-Horenczyk, & Noll, 2011). They tend to miss class, can be withdrawn, isolated, or angry, and display more anxiety about public speaking, assessments, and deadlines.

NMU Counseling Services offers several other signals of psychological distress including:

  • Withdrawing from social interactions
  • Increase in use of substances
  • Increased tendency to get into arguments with others
  • Indiscriminate sexual involvement with multiple partners
  • Increase in other risk-taking behaviors
  • Lethargic mood
  • Falling GPA
  • Any self-destructive behaviors
  • Becoming very pessimistic or hopeless in topics of conversation
  • Preoccupation with, or references to, death (suicide or homicide)
  • Weight loss or gain or changes in sleep patterns (up all hours of the day or night, or excessive sleeping)
  • Unusual or bizarre responses like talking off the subject or rambling

Campus Resources

What should we do if our students display any of these signs of trauma? Counseling Services suggests the following appropriate actions to take with distressed students:

  • Check it out. Ask the student how they are: "I'm worried about you." "I'm wondering what's going on that might be upsetting you."
  • Reinforce the person for confiding in you and maintain a nonjudgmental and accepting manner.
  • Acknowledge and empathize with the student's pain, and give the student time to express themself.
  • When the problem requires more than general support and encouragement, indicate in a gentle but direct manner that professional assistance is a positive step.
  • Any type of message about suicide should be taken seriously. If you believe a student is in imminent danger of harming themself, immediately contact NMU Police Department at 911.
  • If you are hearing statements or hints about suicide from a student, keep in mind that professionals assess suicide potential, in part, by asking if the person has a plan for suicide. They ask exactly how it will happen and when they intend to carry out the plan. They also ask if the person has ever attempted suicide in the past. The more specific and lethal the plan, the more recent a previous attempt, and the greater the ability to carry out the plan, the higher the risk for an actual suicide. Emergency services may be needed (NMU Police Department or 911).
  • It is appropriate for any campus professional to ask these questions. Many students think about suicide as a way to resolve overwhelming problems. They may just need a chance to talk about the feelings, and some hope that the problems can be solved.

Remember, sometimes students choose not to get the help they need and subsequently do not follow through with getting services. This is a very difficult situation, but it does happen. Since students are adults, we cannot compel them to do things, even when it is glaringly apparent they need it.

Note: When referring students for counseling, if the student has ingested any dangerous substance, or if the student is impaired due to a substance, refer them to community hospital resources at (906) 228-9440 or NMU Police Department at (906) 227-2151. When an on-campus student seems to be at risk for self-destructive behavior patterns, you can also inform Housing and Residence Life so they can address the problem in the residence hall.

Talk with the student in private, if possible. Inform the student about the confidential, free counseling services. Have the phone number ready: (906) 227-2980.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, counseling and consultation services are provided through telehealth. This service is available to ALL currently enrolled NMU students, including Global Campus students.  

Possible statement: "It sounds as though you have been under stress, aren't doing very well, and need to talk with someone about this. I would suggest you set up an appointment at Counseling and Consultation Services. I could call and help you make arrangements right now. What do you think about that?"

Counseling and Consultation Services provides consultation for any staff member who needs assistance with:

  • Assessing the seriousness of a situation
  • Clarifying your own concerns and feelings about the situation
  • Choosing an effective approach for interacting with the student
  • Identifying the best way to facilitate the student's use of counseling services

Dial HELP crisis hotline is available 24/7 for free, confidential, non-judgmental crisis intervention and referral services:

CALL: (906) 482-4357

TEXT: (906) 356-3337

CHAT: dialhelp.org

All students, faculty, and staff have access to TAO (Therapy Assistance Online). It is another great self-help resource, “an engaging, interactive program to learn life skills and to help bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life.” TAO includes educational modules, assessments, practice tools and logs, and a mindfulness library.

 

TAO

 

Next week, we will apply teaching practices to work effectively with those experiencing trauma.

A very special thank you to Dr. Christine Hartline; her significant knowledge and expertise in this space has been utilized to guide this professional development series regarding trauma.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.


For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Bonanno, G. A., Pat-Horenczyk, R., & Noll, J. (2011). Coping flexibility and trauma: The perceived ability to cope with trauma (PACT) scale. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 3(2), 117-129.

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Hoch, A., Stewart, D., Webb, K., & Wyandt-Hiebert, M. A. (2015, May). Trauma-informed care on a college campus. Presentation at the annual meeting of the American College Health Association, Orlando, FL.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

 

Vol. 2, Issue 5, August 7, 2020

Beginning this week and throughout the Fall 2020 term, the BYTE will be served sunny-side up each and every Friday.

As we brace ourselves for the return to campus and the unknown impact that the global pandemic may have upon our students, faculty, staff, and the wider community, we begin a four-part series related to trauma-informed teaching practices. The learning objectives for these professional development pieces include: 1) define trauma, describe its pervasiveness, and explain the effects on learning and development, 2) recognize signs of trauma in our students, 3) apply teaching practices to work effectively with those experiencing trauma, and 4) develop competencies to avoid secondary traumatic stress when working with trauma-affected learners. Therefore, a word of caution and a disclaimer as the next several weeks will contain disturbing content and may be very difficult for some to read, prompting feelings of stress, anxiety, and retraumatization.

A Definition of Trauma
Worldwide, the pandemic has yielded a significant amount of trauma, fear, distress, anxiety, and depression. Every aspect of work and life has changed. Nearly 5 million COVID-19 cases have been diagnosed in our country and approximately 160,000 lives have been lost. Extensive racial disparities have been exposed throughout the outbreak. Twice as many black Americans have died as compared to whites. In eight states, Hispanics and Latinos have confirmed cases four times greater than the population (Godoy & Wood, 2020). Many poor workers were not able to shelter at home and for those that did, millions are temporarily or permanently unemployed, causing housing and food insecurities and economic upheaval for small businesses (Zaki, 2020).

In the literature, trauma has been defined as an inability to cope with an overwhelming experience (Hoch, Stewart, Webb, & Wyandt-Hiebert, 2015). Some of these traumas are isolated while others could be ongoing. Trauma-inducing events include abuse, abandonment, violence, bullying, military combat, acts of terrorism, serious accidents, death or loss of a loved one, life-threatening illness, and health epidemics or pandemics.

Trauma in Society
By the time high school students attend college, 66-85% have been exposed to at least one trauma (Smyth, Hockemeyer, Heron, Wonderlich, & Pennebaker, 2008). Up to 50% of college students are exposed to trauma during their first year of college (Galatzer-Levy, Burton, & Bonnano, 2012). According to a 2013 study, 4 out of every 10 children in the United States experienced a physical assault within the last year with 1 out of every 10 suffering an injury from the assault (Finkelhor, Turner, Shattuck, & Hamby, 2013). In the United States, 26% of children have witnessed or endured a traumatic event by the age of 4 (National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 2012). According to Finkelhor et al. (2013), 2% of all children have experienced a sexual assault or abuse, with the rate increasing to nearly 11% for girls aged 14-17 years old.

The Consequences of Trauma on Learning
Trauma in childhood can adversely influence cognitive development. Those exposed to childhood trauma are more likely to have behavioral issues, be absent from class or work, and repeat grades (Shonk & Cicchetti, 2001). Moreover, students who have experienced trauma may acquire a distrust of adult authority figures, including teachers. These misgivings stem from feelings that adults in the past have neglected to keep them safe and shield them from the historic traumas they have experienced. These students may distinguish rules and consequences as punishments or mistreatments, increasing the potential for retraumatization (Streeck-Fischer & van der Kolk, 2000). Another point to make is that traumatized students may be more suspicious of others; they may not be able to cultivate relationships with others as easily as those who have not had these traumatic experiences (Margolin & Gordis, 2000).

Here are several additional statistics with respect to the effects of childhood trauma into adulthood (Davidson, 2019):

  • 15x more likely to attempt suicide
  • 2.5x more likely to smoke
  • 4x more likely to become an alcoholic
  • 3x more likely to be absent from work and have problems at the workplace
  • 4x more likely to develop a sexually transmitted disease
  • 2x more likely to have a serious financial problem

Next week, we will walk through how to recognize signs of trauma in our students or others, for that matter.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.


For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Finkelhor, D., Turner, H. A., Shatuck, A., & Hamby, S. L. (2013). Violence, crime, and abuse exposure in a national sample of children and youth: An update. JAMA Pediatrics, 167(7), 614-621.

Galatzer-Levy, I. R., Burton, C. L., & Bonanno, G. A. (2012). Coping flexibility, potentially traumatic life events, and resilience: A prospective study of college student adjustment. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 31(6), 542-567.

Godoy, M., & Wood, D. (2020). What do coronavirus racial disparities look like state by state? NPR. Retrieved from https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/05/30/865413079/what-do-coronavirus-racial-disparities-look-like-state-by-state

Hoch, A., Stewart, D., Webb, K., & Wyandt-Hiebert, M. A. (2015, May). Trauma-informed care on a college campus. Presentation at the annual meeting of the American College Health Association, Orlando, FL.

Margolin, G., & Gordis, E. B. (2000). The effects of family and community violence on children. Annual Review of Psychology, 51, 445-479.

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention (2012). Childhood trauma and its effect on healthy development. Retrieved from Education Development website http://www.promoteprevent.org/content/childhood-trauma-and-its-effect-healthy-development

Shonk, S. M., & Cicchetti, D. (2001). Maltreatment, competency deficits, and risk for academic and behavioral maladjustment. Developmental Psychology, 37(1), 3-17.

Smyth, J. M., Hockemeyer, J. R., Heron, K. E., Wonderlich, S. A., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2008). Prevalence, type, disclosure, and severity of adverse life events in college students. Journal of American College Healthy, 57(1), 69-76.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Streeck-Fischer, A., & van der Kolk, B. A. (2000). Down will come baby, cradle and all: Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of chronic trauma on child development. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 34(6), 903-918.

Vol. 2, Issue 4, July 27, 2020

This week, we conclude our HyFlex miniseries with a Black Rocks deep dive into teaching delivery in this multimodal learning environment. With a HyFlex course, faculty develop two versions of the same course, one online and the other in-person. The key is connecting them into a single course experience.

With course delivery, no matter what the modality, think the well-known and highly respected Chickering and Gamson (1987) seven principles for good teaching. These high impact practices promote effective teaching in any learning space.

Examples of these practices translated and applied to the online version of a HyFlex course offering include:

1. Encourage contact between students and faculty

  • Responding to emails, questions, and discussions promptly, ideally within 24 hours or less
  • Inclusion of multiple methods for students to interact with the instructor including the Remind101 app
  • Virtual office hours using Zoom or some other technology
  • Personalized welcome letters
  • A VoiceThread faculty and student introduction forum
  • Posting regular course announcements
  • Periodic student check-ins with faculty
  • Reaching out to students who are struggling
  • Mentoring individual learners
  • Participating in online discussion forums
  • Providing substantive, personalized feedback
  • Incorporating an instructor-facilitated Q&A forum into an online course
  • Lectures recorded by the faculty

2. Develops reciprocity and cooperation among students

  • Collective brainstorming on a problem or project using discussion forums, VoiceThread, or Google docs
  • Building course community through learner introductions using VoiceThread or discussion forums, especially when faculty prompt students to respond to peer introductions, share their learning goals or other course-related experiences
  • The joint construction of some learning artifact (assignment, case study, rubrics)
  • The use of team-based learning (TBL) simulations, inquiries, or debates
  • Faculty support of the development of collaborative learning skills
  • The use of student-led small group discussion leaders who initiate discussion around an instructor-identified topic, and respond to peers, or offer resources to their group
  • Designing discussions or other activities for meaningful, intentional learning in communities

3. Encourages active learning

  • Learner responses (audio, video, text, text marking, drawing) to instructor lectures or learner-presentations in VoiceThread.
  • Encouraging learners to inquire, share connections, and ask questions that are explored in small-groups or whole-class forums or VT discussions.
  • Inviting students to share what they know, self-assess their background knowledge, and/or to set learning goals through activities like course entrance tickets, surveys, module feedback surveys, course exit-tickets
  • Encouraging learners' self-assessment, reflection, and progress-monitoring
  • Designing the course to include opportunities for learners to use/apply course concepts and/or skills to situations, to events or contexts outside of the course, or to their personal learning goals. 
  • Providing choices for readings or for ways for students to demonstrate their understanding of course concepts. 
  • Role playing, jigsaw discussions, experiential learning (site visits), brainstorming, games or simulations.

4. Gives prompt feedback

  • Communicate a feedback policy in the course syllabus, including a summarized grading rubric and the timing in which students can expect to receive it. The sooner that feedback can be provided, the better for our students. Feedback identifies the gap between learning objectives (the plan) and learning outcomes (the results).
  • Use detailed grading rubrics in the course to clearly define expectations.
  • Align feedback with learning objectives. Students should know what they are expected to learn and why. The ‘why’ is nearly as important as the feedback, itself, because students are more motivated when they know that the assignments are not sheer busy work.
  • Consider the use of tools like VoiceThread to provide audio and/or video feedback.
  • Provide feedback that is specific, constructive, personalized, and actionable.
  • Prioritize feedback to focus on areas that will have the greatest impact on learning.
  • Connect feedback to lived experiences for deeper meaning.
  • Remember, that feedback does not need to involve a letter grade.
  • Incorporate activities that enable peer feedback such as critiques and discussion forums.

5. Emphasizes time on task

  • Encourage students to create a personalized course schedule, based on their life and time commitments.
  • Communicate in the syllabus and/or the course room how much time students should expect to devote to the class each week. The general rule of thumb for undergraduate courses delivered during a traditional academic term is that one credit hour equals 2-3 hours of studying outside of class. Therefore, a 4-credit hour course would require an investment of approximately 8-12 hours per week.
  • Provide students with the length of time each learning activity should take to complete, on average. Establishing activity completion benchmarks may help students to avoid procrastination.
  • Promote the use of a weekly checklist to stay organized.
  • To help students stay on track, consider the use of the EduCat course calendar or a stand-alone course schedule document to outline when learning activities are due.
  • Adopt the EduCat Activity Completion tool to enable students with the ability to mark a learning activity as completed and track their progress.

6. Communicates high expectations

  • Clearly, encouragingly, and regularly communicate faculty expectations of students. Consider the use of announcements, discussion forums, VoiceThread recordings, or a learning activity to express them. Remember, classroom expectations should stretch well beyond grading.
  • Foster an inclusive climate of high expectations and reinforce them throughout the course.
  • Post expectations in the course syllabus and/or in an area of the course room devoted to expectations.
  • Create a faculty expectations contract. Ask students to acknowledge their understanding of the requirements. A discussion forum or a quiz can be used to document student agreement of faculty expectations.
  • Model the expectations that you expect from your students.
  • Give all students realistic but supportive feedback. Learner-instructor and learner-learner interactions can provide opportunities to bridge the gap between performance and expectations or inspire students to advance beyond them.
  • Provide student exemplars (with exemplar permission). Seeing an example of a job well done that exceeds expectations can raise the tide and lift all boats.
  • Reward correct answers or redirect those that may be off base in a discussion forum with follow-up questions that extend knowledge, and expectations, even further.
  • Avoid forecasting failure in the classroom. Instead, prepare students for a difficult exam or assignment and encourage their success.

7. Respects diverse talents and ways of learning

  • Offer information and learning content in more than one format. For example, instead of presenting information in a text-based format only, incorporate audio and video recording.
  • Differentiate assessments and provide students with a choice to demonstrate their achievement of learning. For instance, students may choose between an exam, a presentation, and a group project to assess the same student learning objectives.
  • Motivate students with engaging learning activities. Meaningful learner-learner and learner-instructor interactions promote engagement. Active learning involves engaging learners by “doing” something, such as discovering, processing, or applying concepts and information. Active learning entails guiding learners to increasing levels of responsibility for their own learning (QM 5.2). Activities for learner-instructor interaction might include an assignment or project submitted for instructor feedback; learner-instructor discussion in a synchronous session or an asynchronous discussion board exchange; or a frequently-asked-questions (FAQ) discussion forum moderated by the instructor. Activities for learner-learner interaction might include assigned collaborative activities such as group discussions; small group projects; group problem-solving assignments; or peer critiques.

Next week, the BYTE will begin an exploration of the pedagogic topic, trauma-informed teaching.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar


*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 3, July 20, 2020

The Global Campus online course design review process is in full swing for the Summer 2020 term. We have received a number of faculty questions to clarify the differences between being ‘distance qualified’ and the online course design review process. This week, the BYTE will walk through both initiatives.

The world continues to be profoundly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic and, as you are all intimately aware, institutions of higher learning are not immune. In March, our entire faculty had to pivot to distance learning to prevent the spread of the virus while maintaining rigor and advancing our dedication to academic excellence. We again approach a new academic year where classroom creativity and adjusting to new learning spaces, instructional formats, and pedagogy/andragogy will be essential.

Distance Qualification
As you know, there is a long-standing requirement that all instructors become Distance Qualified (4-week experience for those who have not taught online for NMU before and self-paced for those who taught online for NMU before the Distance Qualification requirements were implemented). This experience qualifies the instructors and provides them with basic training on how to use the learning management system (EduCat) and other technologies used in teaching online.

https://www.nmu.edu/ctl/teaching-online-nmu

The Global Campus Online Course Design Review
The Global Campus online course design review qualifies the course and, as such, focuses on online course design. This quality review process is required by the Higher Learning Commission, our accrediting body.  The Online Teaching Fellows program is an optional professional development program that involves two highly intensive learning experiences that prepare instructors in both use of technology and course design.

Because of the significant demand placed upon our faculty both during the winter and summer semesters and during the upcoming fall term, Academic Affairs has temporarily paused the Distance Qualification requirements. Faculty seeking a waiver should request one through their respective dean, department head, or department chair. However, the Global Campus online course design review process remains a requirement for every course taught online (asynchronous, coded with a 50-range) and directed studies taught online that are the equivalent of a face-to-face course.

We know that some courses were shifted online for the very first time without much notice or for the possibility for faculty to attend professional development sessions offered by the Center for Teaching and Learning and/or the Global Campus. While the Global Campus online course design review may seem summative at this point (to meet the expectations of the HLC), we are hoping to consider this more of a formative process of continuous improvement of online courses. The Global Campus Extended Learning and Community Engagement Scholar, Dr. Stacy Boyer-Davis, and the instructional design team at the Center for Teaching and Learning are poised and excited to guide and support the faculty with their efforts to learn more about online course design and delivery best practices and to understand, meet, and exceed the quality standards expected by the HLC.

Next week, we will examine HyFlex teaching delivery best practices, an extension of the content offered in the first two issues of Volume 2. Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar
*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 13, 2020

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic forced a majority of institutions to shift to an entirely online mode of delivery, blended and HyFlex course offerings were growing in popularity in the higher education arena. Colleges and universities have adopted HyFlex courses to maximize the opportunity for students to participate and persist, to benefit student athletes and their competitive travel requirements, traditional and non-traditional students with jobs and other responsibilities or long commute times, or in semesters with inclement weather (perhaps any given fall AND winter at NMU). Now, these pedagogical methodologies of student choice are becoming the norm as the virus has forced us to apply creative thinking in how we manage physical distancing, student and faculty accommodations, in order to prevent the spread.

HyFlex Course Design Best Practices

How do we get started developing a HyFlex course, or even a hybrid course, for that matter? The answer resides in the Quality Matters (QM) online course design quality standards. First, we should begin with constructing the overall learning objectives of the course, what we expect our students to know and be able to do in order to exhibit an expected competency level. In completing this step, we can begin to map the structure of the rest of the course including instructional materials, learning activities, and assessments. No matter how we administer our courses (on the ground, online, hybrid, HyFlex, synchronous, asynchronous), learning objectives are key, the building blocks of effective course design.

Course learning objectives should be measurable. Measurable course learning objectives or competencies precisely and clearly describe what learners will learn and be able to do if they successfully complete the course. Course objectives or competencies describe desired learning mastery using terms that are specific and observable enough to be measured by the instructor. Examples of measurable learning outcomes or competencies use Bloom’s Taxonomy action verbs such as select, develop, articulate, explain, describe, apply, analyze, or create. Examples of learning outcomes or competencies that are not measurable include words or phrases including: understand, demonstrate, know, learn, be aware of, demonstrate an appreciation of, demonstrate knowledge of, and realize.

Once learning objectives are clearly identified for the course and each learning unit or module, the next step is to decide how learning can be effectively met in both the physical and virtual classrooms. Remember, with a HyFlex model, students choose their mode of participation as learning takes place simultaneously in both spaces. Faculty must ensure learning equivalency, meaning that students should study and experience comparable course content and resources, have similar access to the faculty, and satisfy course requirements in an analogous way regardless of how they attend. Students cannot be disadvantaged in the learning process resulting from the pathway to learning that they choose.

Students are never required to come to a physical class in a HyFlex model. They can opt to attend e-class 100% of the time. As a result, all assignments, assessments, and learning activities should be made available to students online. For face-to-face meetings, consider recording lectures or discussions and posting them online. Students who attend classes in the online environment can, then, watch the recordings at a later time. Furthermore, the recordings can be used by students who attended the in-person sections for studying purposes and to reinforce their understanding of the content.

Be sure to design course activities and assessments with accessibility in mind (images with alt text, videos with transcripts or captions, appropriate font color and size, etc.). Earlier issues of the BYTE explored accessibility. Consider using Respondus Monitor to proctor online exams to prevent opportunities for cheating; two Respondus Monitor professional development sessions will be held on Thursday, July 30 at 4 pm and Wednesday, August 5 at 3 pm, facilitated by Matt Smock and myself.

The online portion of the course should be just as interactive as the in-class counterpart. Design with engagement in mind. The Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the University’s accrediting body, does not permit correspondence courses. NMU is only approved for distance education courses in the online learning space. In order for a course to be distance education qualified, three types of interaction must be present: learner-learner, learner-instructor, and learner-content. Activities for learner-instructor interaction might include an assignment or project submitted for instructor feedback; learner-instructor discussion in a synchronous session or an asynchronous discussion board exchange; or a frequently-asked questions (FAQ) discussion forum moderated by the instructor. Learner-instructor interaction must be regular, substantive, and initiated by the instructor.  Activities for learner-learner interaction might include assigned collaborative activities such as group discussions; small-group projects; group problem-solving assignments; or peer critiques.

Next week, we will examine HyFlex teaching delivery best practices.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar
*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf

Vol. 2, Issue 1, July 6, 2020

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic forced a majority of institutions to shift to an entirely online mode of delivery, blended and HyFlex course offerings were growing in popularity in the higher education arena. Colleges and universities have adopted HyFlex courses to maximize the opportunity for students to participate and persist, to benefit student athletes and their competitive travel requirements, traditional and non-traditional students with jobs and other responsibilities or long commute times, or in semesters with inclement weather (perhaps any given fall AND winter at NMU). Now, these pedagogical methodologies of student choice are becoming the norm as the virus has forced us to apply creative thinking in how we manage physical distancing, student and faculty accommodations, in order to prevent the spread.

HyFlex Course Design

First, a “HyFlex” course is not the same as a hybrid (blended) course, our professional development miniseries focus during the month of June. HyFlex is a combination of the terms “hybrid” and “flexibility.” HyFlex combines the characteristics of a hybrid course (online and face-to-face components) with a flexible course structure to provide students with the option to modify their manner of attendance throughout a given course (Liu & Rodriguez, 2019).

In a HyFlex course, students can choose whether they attend classes online, face-to-face, or both. For example, students can opt to attend one week in person and another week online. With this flexible hybrid course design, faculty deliver content in both modes. A HyFlex is not a correspondence course, nor is it self-paced. However, course sessions can be synchronous or asynchronous.

A recent Inside HigherEd article emphasized the HyFlex model as a COVID-19 solution (Maloney & Kim, 2020). A link to it is below.

Inside HigherEd HyFlex Model Article

Next week, the BYTE delves into the scholarship of teaching and learning to propose HyFlex course design best practices.

Stay healthy, safe, and strong my faculty friends.

Best regards,

Stacy
Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar

Read Vol. 2, Issue 2
*************************************************************************************************************

The Global Campus has adopted the Seven Principles to serve as the framework for online course delivery standards (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). The Quality Matters (QM®) peer-reviewed quality assurance program has been adopted to evaluate course design rigor. Both methodologies align with and parallel the call for learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interactions to promote active learning engagement (QM 5.2). For HLC accreditation purposes, all online courses must include learner-instructor, learner-learner, and learner-content interaction (regular and substantive, initiated by the instructor) because correspondence courses are not permitted.

For more information on the Global Campus online course requirements or the SoTL related to them, and/or to curate a conversation about high impact teaching design and delivery practices in your online courses, please reach out to Stacy, the Extended Learning and Community Engagement (ELCE) Scholar via email onlreview@nmu.edu or telephone (906) 227-1805.

Faculty are encouraged to contribute to the ONLINE BYTE OF THE WEEK. Please email Stacy at sboyerda@nmu.edu with your ideas.

REFERENCES

Chickering, A. W., & Gamson, Z. F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. AAHE Bulletin, 39(7), 3-7.

Liu, C. A., & Rodriguez, R. C. (2019). Evaluation of the impact of the Hyflex learning model. International Journal of Innovation and Learning, 25(4), 393-411.

Maloney, E., & Kim, J. (2020). Fall scenario #13: A HyFlex model. Inside HigherEd. https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/learning-innovation/fall-scenario-13-hyflex-model

Standards from the Quality Matters (QM) Higher Education Rubric, 6th Edition. Quality Matters. Retrievedfromhttps://www.qualitymatters.org/sites/default/files/PDFs/StandardsfromtheQMHigherEducationRubric.pdf