Siril Endowment for the Musical Arts

 

At Northern Michigan University, we recognize that artists of all kinds make a unique contribution to our society through cultural enhancement and enrichment. We prepare our students not only as professionals but also as ambassadors for creativity, diversity and new perspectives in the workplace, in the community, in the classroom and in the day-to-day lives of all those who benefit from their skill and are touched by their talent. Future generations will be the ones to develop startling new concepts and voices that will help us better understand ourselves and the world around us. It is our responsibility to expose our students to a wide range of ideas, challenges and expectations from as many perspectives as possible. Music, in particular, through understanding and appreciation, offers unique opportunities to articulate deeper meanings and discoveries beyond the constraints of language and cultural traditions. That is why music as a discipline and expression has a long tradition at NMU.

That is also why it is incumbent upon NMU to sustain and expand its ability to bring new worlds of music to our campus for the edification, enlightenment and enjoyment of our students and the general public.

The Siril Endowment for the Music Arts is designed to do exactly that by providing funds to establish and maintain a visiting artist program directed by the NMU Music Department and the funds to import performances that expose students to a wide variety of music genres. Each of these new endeavors will be integrated into the curriculum for maximum impact.

2021-22 Series Schedule

 

These events are all brought to you by the Siril Endowment for the Musical Arts.

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Wisconsin Brass Quintet Head Shots

The Wisconsin Brass Quintet (w/special guest Matthew Endres)

“A Night at the Movies”

  • Friday, September 17
  • 7:30pm
  • Reynolds Recital Hall
  • Admission is FREE!

Regarded as one of the “superb brass ensembles in the USA” (Musicweb International) and praised for “remarkable musicianship and versatility” (International Trumpet Guild Journal), the widely acclaimed Wisconsin Brass Quintet (WBQ) has maintained a position at the forefront of brass chamber music since the group’s founding in 1972. In addition to its regular concert series on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Quintet performs extensively throughout the Midwest and nationally, including appearances in New York at Weill Recital Hall and Merkin Concert Hall. Its players have been members of the American Brass Quintet, Empire Brass Quintet, and Meridian Arts Ensemble.

The WBQ’s commitment to commissioning and performing new music has attracted the attention of many renowned composers, including Verne Reynolds, Jan Bach, Karel Husa, John Harbison, and Daron Hagen. The Quintet’s premiere recordings of works by these composers and others can be found on the Summit, Mark, and Crystal record labels. American Record Guide reviewer Barry Kilpatrick writes: “The WBQ is a remarkable ensemble that plays with more reckless abandon, warmth, stylistic variety and interpretive interest than almost any quintet in memory.”

In demand for its engaging educational programs and master classes, the WBQ has presented clinics and residencies at such prestigious institutions as The Juilliard School, the Yale School of Music, the University of Michigan and Northwestern University. Since 2014, the WBQ has hosted Brass Fest, an annual festival featuring concerts, master classes, and seminars held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Guest artists have included the Western Brass Quintet, Axiom Brass Quintet, tubist Øystein Baadsvik, trumpeter Adam Rapa, and composer Anthony Plog.

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Mezzo-Soprano Janet Hopkins in performance

Janet Hopkins

  • Friday, November 12
  • 7:30pm
  • Reynolds Recital Hall

Tickets (www.nmu.edu/tickets)

  • General Admission $12
  • Youth (18 and under) - Free
  • NMU Students - Free

Renowned dramatic mezzo-soprano Janet Hopkins, a 16-year veteran of the New York Metropolitan Opera, continues to thrill audiences on her concert tour of symphonic stages across America. Recent performances include the Verdi Requiem at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, El Amor Brujo (South Carolina Philharmonic), Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony (Bowling Green Symphony Orchestra, Kentucky) and Alexander Nevsky (West Shore Symphony Orchestra, MI).

Known for her innovative style and approach to bringing classical music to broader audiences, Miss Hopkins won critical acclaim from The New York Times and USA Today for the limited edition ARIA. A first-of-its-kind music and fine wine project, ARIA is the marriage of a world-class wine personally blended by Miss Hopkins with Tulip Hill Winery and her recording of well-known classical Italian love songs at historic Capitol Records in Hollywood. The boxed set was an immediate mainstream hit.

Miss Hopkins made her debut at the Metropolitan Opera during the 1991–1992 season. Since then, opera lovers have appreciated her diverse repertoire on the world’s greatest stage.

She debuted at The Met in The Ghost of Versailles, and has since returned many times over the years, pleasing audiences in Die Walküre, Die Frau ohne Schatten, Der Rosenkavalier, Katya Kabanova, Elektra, Jenufa, Il Barbiere di Siviglia, War and Peace, Les Mamelles de Tiresias, L’Enfant et les Sortileges, Khovanschina, Doktor Faustus,The Makropulos Case, Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk, The Bartered Bride, and Parsifal. Miss Hopkins has toured Japan three times with The Met in Der Rosenkavalier, Die Walküre, and Rigoletto. While in Japan, she sang a series of solo recitals in Tokyo, garnering much critical acclaim.

Away from touring and performing, Miss Hopkins enjoys her position as a member of the voice faculty at the University of South Carolina in Columbia.

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Adam Sadberry publicity photo

Adam Sadberry

  • Friday, February 18 @ 7:30pm
  • Reynolds Recital Hall

Tickets (www.nmu.edu/tickets)

  • General Admission $12
  • Youth (18 and under) - Free
  • NMU Students - Free

Memphis Symphony Orchestra acting principal flutist Adam Sadberry is known for his radiant, lyrical playing, and he is committed to expanding the Black diaspora in the classical music world through promoting equity, representation, music education, and commissioning music that tells stories of the Black diaspora - in other words, creating musical journalism. Adam is extremely motivated to continue the legacy of his late grandfather L. Alex Wilson, an important journalist and unsung hero of the Civil Rights Movement.

Adam has performed with orchestras around the country including the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Albany Symphony Orchestra, Omaha Symphony, Sphinx Symphony Orchestra, and the New World Symphony. As a concerto soloist, he has performed with the Clear Lake Symphony, Conroe Symphony Orchestra, Cordancia Chamber Orchestra, and the Detroit Chamber Orchestra, and he has also made guest appearances at Oakland University, University of Memphis, University of South Florida, National Flute Association, and the New York Flute Club to give recitals, masterclasses, and presentations. Adam’s presentation Using Your Identity to Create a Relevant Voice in Music lays a foundation for using one’s experiences and perspectives as a catalyst for generating change through music.

Along with maintaining a private flute studio, Adam teaches and mentors through non-profit organizations that provide free private lessons and resources to underserved communities including The Key Change and Raise the Bar. He is proud to have taught through the Memphis Music Initiative, an organization that “invest[s] in youth through transformative music engagement, creating equitable opportunities for black and brown youth in Memphis”. He is also on the boards of the Umoja Flute Institute and the International Society of Black Musicians, organizations that provide resources to musicians of African descent.

Adam’s education includes receiving a Bachelor of Music in Flute Performance and a Performer’s Certificate from the Eastman School of Music and being a fellow with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. He is indebted to all of his former teachers and mentors including Bonita Boyd, Anne Harrow, Jennifer Keeney, Amanda Blaikie, Sharon Sparrow, and Jeff Zook. In his spare time, Adam enjoys roller skating, being in nature, and eating as much food as his body can handle.

Adam can be heard playing on the soundtrack of Disney’s The Lion King (2019).

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Invoke publicity photo

Invoke

  • Friday, March 18 @ 7:30pm
  • Reynolds Recital Hall

Tickets (www.nmu.edu/tickets)

  • General Admission $12
  • Youth (18 and under) - Free
  • NMU Students - Free

Described by one pretty important radio guy as “not classical…but not not classical” (David Srebnik, SiriusXM Classical Producer), Invoke continues to successfully dodge even the most valiant attempts at genre classification. The multi-instrumental band’s other “not-nots” encompass traditions from across America, including bluegrass, Appalachian fiddle tunes, jazz, and minimalism. Invoke weaves all of these styles together to create truly individual music, written by and for the group.

Equally at home in a collaborative setting, Invoke has performed with musicians from widely varying genres, from the Ensō Quartet, to chamber rock powerhouse San Fermin, to beatboxer/rapper/spoons virtuoso Christylez Bacon. Invoke’s two albums (Souls in the Mud and Furious Creek) both feature original works composed by and for the group, and the quartet has also performed and recorded numerous world premieres. Invoke believes in championing diverse American voices, including their ongoing commissioning project American Postcards, which asks composers to pick a time and place in American history and tell its story through Invoke’s unique artistry.